Choice Pre-War Cruisers

Choice Pre-War Cruisers

Lincole ZephyrThere is something magical about the cars that were sold between World War I and World War II. The “pre-war” look was heavy, but aerodynamic, masculine, but rather sexy, too. This art-deco look also known as the “coffin cars” will never be replicated and the rock-solid construction was and still is, second-to-none. There were some pre-war styles that did reappear during the post-war era, but as soon as the automakers got their production capabilities back to normal, their cars began to take on a different look. These are a few of the choice pre-war cars that define the era:

High Tech Lo Tech: Concept Cars from 1969

High Tech Lo Tech: Concept Cars from 1969

Buick Century Cruiser - Photo Courtesy of oldconceptcars.com

Buick Century Cruiser – Photo Courtesy of oldconceptcars.com

General Motors was on a roll in the 1960s, with muscle cars and cars inspired by the space race. The biggest automaker in the world ended the decade with concept cars that took imagination and innovation to an entirely new level. These cars looked more like space ships than speed demons and they were created with idea of where technology could take us when we were on the roads.

Miata vs. Solstice

Miata vs. Solstice

1990 Mazda MiataIn 1989, Mazda released a car that changed automobile design for the next 30 years. The release of the Mazda Miata was a moment of absolute joy for drivers who desired a two-seater convertible that didn’t spend the majority of its time in the auto shop. Prior to the release of the Miata, the only options were European roadsters like the MGB, Triumph, and Alfa Romeo. These classic convertibles offered absolutely no competition to the Miata because they all had serious problems with reliability. For 17 years, the Mazda Miata dominated the two-door convertible roadster market, until Pontiac made its mark with the Solstice in 2006.

1951 Chrysler Saratoga

1951 Chrysler Saratoga

1951 Chrysler SaratogaFrom 1939 to 1960, with a few interruptions, Chrysler used the Saratoga nameplate as first the most expensive, full-sized eight-cylinder model, then as the least expensive eight-cylinder, and finally somewhere in between. The 1951 Chrysler Saratoga was positioned at the bottom of the company’s eight-cylinder cars, but was also made available with the famous HemiV8 engine.

In 1951, Chrysler introduced the Hemi to replace the basic straight-eight that had been in place as far back as 1930. The Hemi was not meant to be a racing engine, but soon enough its high-performance capabilities were realized and cars like the 1951 Chrysler Saratoga were being used in road races and drag races and eventually on the stock car circuit.