Tag Archives: Ford

Ford at the Le Mans Race

Ford at the Le Mans Race 1964 Ford GT40The Le Mans race is the oldest continuous car race and has been going on since 1923, other than 1936 and the years between 1940 and 1948 due to World War II. Racing teams keep their car going for 24 hours as drivers drive prestigious and fast cars for two hours at a time. They rest for two hours and then get back to it again. Most recent changes have changed the teams from two drivers to three drivers. The race has been held in Le Mans, France and is always scheduled in the summer. 1954 JaguarOver the nearly 90 years of racing, the majority of winning automobiles have been made by European carmakers. In the first ten years of the race, the majority of winners were cars made by Bentley or Alfa Romeo. In the 1950s, the majority of winners were manufactured by Ferrari or Jaguar. The winners seemed to flip-flop between cars made in Italy and in the UK, until the late-1960s, when Ford GT40 models were back-to-back winners for four straight years. The Ford GT40 was the first American-made car to win the Le Mans. After the four Ford GT40 wins, the only other American-made entry was a McLaren F1 GTR in 1995. The first year that the Ford GT40 won, it did not just win, but a GT40 finished in first, second, and third place. The winning drivers in 1966 included Bruce McLaren a driver from New Zealand and Chris Amon. The following year, AJ Foyt and Dan Gurney took first, with McLaren’s team coming up in fourth. In 1968, only one Ford GT40 finished in the top 10 and it was raced by Pedro Rodriguez and Lucien Bianchi. In its final year of racing, the 1969 winning team included Jacky Ickx and Jackie Oliver. A second Ford GT40 finished in third place that year. Interestingly, two of the GT40 drivers, AJ Foyt and Jacky Ickx, were some of the most successful drivers in the history of the Le Mans races. Foyt won three times, which was exactly how many times he participated in the race. Ickx won six times.

Lincoln Mark II and Elizabeth Taylor

Lincoln Mark II and Elizabeth Taylor

Photo by Michael Kovac/Getty Images for Lincoln

Photo by Michael Kovac/Getty Images for Lincoln

In 2012 at the Los Angeles Auto Show, Lincoln did not have any new cars to display, since the future of the brand was in flux. So, the carmaker brought out a classic from the Golden Years of Hollywood and the heyday of automobiles. In 1956-1957, the Continental Lincoln Mark II was the most glamorous automobile available. It was built by hand and cost nearly $10,000, which was the equivalent of a Rolls Royce and a Bentley at the time.

Unfortunately Named Cars

Unfortunately Named Cars

As a car fan, I enjoy learning about the significance of the names that cars are given. Many names have interesting etymologies. From the Corvette being named after swiftly moving Navy ships to the Shelby Cobra being named after a dangerous snake, many car makers get the names just right. Then there are cars like the Plymouth Duster, Ford Probe, and the Chevy Nova. These cars have names that are easy to spell, easy to say, but they have no sense of coolness at all.

'70 Plymouth Duster

Masterpiece Vintage Cars

Masterpiece Vintage Cars

MasterpieceJust south of Indianapolis, Indiana is a car lover’s dream: the Masterpiece Vintage Cars showroom. Like a candy store for classic car enthusiasts, this showroom is stocked with a variety of refurbished and restored classics, like 1930s Fords, 1950s Chevys, and 1960s American muscle cars. Even if you aren’t sure you’re ready to buy or sell, this showplace is well worth a visit.

The owners and operators of Masterpiece Vintage Cars brought together decades of experience and a passion for older cars to help serve fellow car enthusiasts with buying, selling, consignment, shipping, financing, and even in searching for that elusive dream car.

Malaise Era: Definition and Examples

Malaise Era: Definition and Examples

'74 Apollo Buick Malaise: This word comes from the combination of French words mal- and aise (which translates to ease). This word generally means a sense of being uneasy or feeling out of sorts. It usually involves the beginning of an illness or feeling less that healthy. The term “malaise” has come to designate the decade of cars produced between 1973 and 1983.

Car Furniture: Hot or Not?

Car Furniture: Hot or Not?

'68 Ford MustangHaving a garage full of your favorite cars is one thing, but what about a house full of your favorite cars – as furniture? You no longer have to visit a 1950’s themed restaurant to find furniture made from car parts. Clever designers are turning every type of car and parts into useful furniture. Would you invite these cars into your home as furniture?

Ford Mustang Furniture

Ford Mustangs from the 1960s have that unmistakable grill and some people have been able to turn the front end into a bar. By chopping off the front and artfully placing a glass tabletop above it, you, too, could have a Ford Mustang bar in your home, too.

The Ford Pinto Controversy: Info for Young Car Collectors

The Ford Pinto Controversy: Info for Young Car Collectors

'76 Ford PintoAs car collectors get younger, their car awareness does not include newsworthy events that predate the 1980s. This means that the newest car collectors do not know much, if anything, about the events surrounding the Ford Pinto. Since very few people drove the Pinto after the recalls in the 1970s, young car collectors have never seen them on the roads. There are not any celebrities who currently drive Pintos so they are not discussed on celebrity blogs. It’s almost as if the Ford Pinto has been successfully buried by those who do not want to show the flaws of the earlier days in the automotive industry.

Choice Pre-War Cruisers

Choice Pre-War Cruisers

Lincole ZephyrThere is something magical about the cars that were sold between World War I and World War II. The “pre-war” look was heavy, but aerodynamic, masculine, but rather sexy, too. This art-deco look also known as the “coffin cars” will never be replicated and the rock-solid construction was and still is, second-to-none. There were some pre-war styles that did reappear during the post-war era, but as soon as the automakers got their production capabilities back to normal, their cars began to take on a different look. These are a few of the choice pre-war cars that define the era:

Cars that Disappointed

Cars that Disappointed

1981 DeloreanIn the world of automobiles, there are hits and misses. Usually the hits last for many years, like the Chevy Corvette, Chevy Camaro, and the Ford Mustang. When the misses arrive, they may not be immediately evident, but eventually, someone will discover the flaws. These are a few of the most disappointing cars to ever hit the showrooms floors:

1961 Chevy Corvair. This car was a hit at first. Who didn’t want a modern looking car that got great gas mileage and was fun to drive? Unfortunately, the car that was designed to compete with the popular VW Beetle was loaded with design flaws. From the dangerous steering mechanisms to the fumes that would leak from the heating unit, the Corvair was a stinker disguised in an adorable package.

The Woodie vs the Wooden Body Tub

The Woodie vs the Wooden Body Tub

'47 Ford WoodyIn today’s world of carbon fiber, steel, and aluminum auto body parts, we often forget that real wood was regularly used. In the 1930s and 1940s, American car makers used actual wood to enclose the passenger compartments in style. These lovingly named “Woodies” had an interesting history. The first Woodies were custom crafted cars with attractive wood paneling, then as World War II cause the production of automobiles to stop, carmakers turned pre-existing sedans in to station wagons by using wood paneling to extend the length and usefulness of the vehicles. Today, the Woodie is synonymous with California surfing.