Tag Archives: Plymouth

Masters of Mileage: Car Longevity Standouts

Masters of Mileage: Car Longevity Standouts

Carmakers are in the business of making money by making cars. In order to sell cars, people need to have cars. Cars need to be replaced as the parts of the cars only work for so long. Car longevity has changed over the years. In the mid-century, cars were expected to last for about 100,000 miles. Now, they should last for at least 200,000 miles. Even though most cars will only last for so many miles, there are some people who work hard to be able to drive their cars for an impressive amount of miles.

Malaise Era: Definition and Examples

Malaise Era: Definition and Examples

'74 Apollo Buick Malaise: This word comes from the combination of French words mal- and aise (which translates to ease). This word generally means a sense of being uneasy or feeling out of sorts. It usually involves the beginning of an illness or feeling less that healthy. The term “malaise” has come to designate the decade of cars produced between 1973 and 1983.

Cars that Disappointed

Cars that Disappointed

1981 DeloreanIn the world of automobiles, there are hits and misses. Usually the hits last for many years, like the Chevy Corvette, Chevy Camaro, and the Ford Mustang. When the misses arrive, they may not be immediately evident, but eventually, someone will discover the flaws. These are a few of the most disappointing cars to ever hit the showrooms floors:

1961 Chevy Corvair. This car was a hit at first. Who didn’t want a modern looking car that got great gas mileage and was fun to drive? Unfortunately, the car that was designed to compete with the popular VW Beetle was loaded with design flaws. From the dangerous steering mechanisms to the fumes that would leak from the heating unit, the Corvair was a stinker disguised in an adorable package.

1968 Plymouth Belvedere

1968 Plymouth Belveder

1968 Plymouth Belevedere

The 1968 Plymouth Belvedere came close to the end of the life for this model, which Chrysler produced from 1954 to 1970. The first incarnation of the model was the 1951 to 1953 Cranbrook Belvedere. The two-door hardtop came out to compete with the Chevy Bel Air. As was always intended for the Plymouth name, this version of the Cranbrook was a low-cost car. In fact, it was the first, affordable two-door hardtop to come out of Detroit.

The Homer: I See You in There

The Homer: I See You in There

 The 1959 Cadillac

Photo Courtesy of www.only-carz.com

Fans of The Simpsons will know The Homer, the car that Homer Simpson designed along with his brother, who happened to be the owner of Powell Motors. This episode (from Season 2) was written as a spoof on the Edsel, which we all know ended sadly. In this episode, Homer designs “The Homer” which brings his brother’s car company to ruin.

Car Classes from the 1960s

Car Classes from the 1960s

'69 Plymouth Road RunnerToday’s automotive lingo includes car classes like exotic, luxury, compact, and sporty – to name a few. Even though most people can name at least one car that would fit into each of these modern category, these categories have not always been. The 1960s was the first decade to see a wide variety of different cars and the categories from the 1960 were quite different than the ones used today. In the 1960s, drivers could pick from pony cars, muscle cars, economy cars, and executive cars.

The Muscle Car and Pony Car

Bury a Belvedere

Bury a Belvedere

'66 Plymouth BelvedereIn 1957, the people of Tulsa, Oklahoma buried a Plymouth Belvedere of the same year. Fifty years later the car dubbed, “Miss Belvedere,” was unearthed. The car was buried into a cement tomb and would be awarded to the person who guessed the population of Tulsa in 2007. The man who won the contest died in 1979 and his prize was given to his sisters who were in their 80s and 90s when they learned they won the car.

Zombie Car Covered in Rust

1966 Plymouth Valiant Signet Hardtop

1966 Plymouth Valiant Signet Hardtop

1966 Plymouth Valiant The Plymouth Valiant brought the Chrysler car company great success in the 1960s and 1970s. Chrysler intended for the Valiant to be part of the growing compact segment, and it sold well in the U.S. as well as in foreign markets. The 1966 Plymouth Valiant Signet hardtop was one of the models in the second generation that ran from 1963 to 1966.

1966 Plymouth Valiant The 1966 Plymouth Valiant Signet hardtop originated at the start of the second generation of Valiants with the 1963 Signet hardtop coupe. This little compact was sporty and stylish, and a major competitor for the Ford Falcon and Chevy Corvair. While the latter received only mild face lifts for 1963, Chrysler remade the Valiant and created the well-received Signet.

So Long Superbird: No NASCAR for You

So Long Superbird: No NASCAR for You

SuperbirdChrysler decided that 1970 was the year of the NASCAR racers. Plymouth had the Superbird and Dodge had the Daytona. These two cars were designed with the hopes that Chrysler would design a car like the Daytona for Richard Petty, who was driving a Plymouth at the time. Unfortunately, since Chrysler could not meet Petty’s demands, he left to drive for Ford. Chrysler took control of their own NASCAR destiny and then created the Plymouth Superbird.

Production Rules in Place

Plymouth and the History of the Name

Plymouth and the History of the Name

'66 Plymouth FuryIn 1928, Chrysler decided to create a low-price name badge to compete with powerhouses Ford and Chevrolet. The idea was that this line would have features that the other low-priced badges did not. The badge that Chrysler created was Plymouth, which lasted until 2001 when DaimlerChrysler decided to end the brand due to low sales.

Not Named for the Town, but for Farmers’ Twine