Tag Archives: Plymouth

1968 Plymouth Belvedere

1968 Plymouth Belveder

1968 Plymouth Belevedere

The 1968 Plymouth Belvedere came close to the end of the life for this model, which Chrysler produced from 1954 to 1970. The first incarnation of the model was the 1951 to 1953 Cranbrook Belvedere. The two-door hardtop came out to compete with the Chevy Bel Air. As was always intended for the Plymouth name, this version of the Cranbrook was a low-cost car. In fact, it was the first, affordable two-door hardtop to come out of Detroit.

The Homer: I See You in There

The Homer: I See You in There

 The 1959 Cadillac

Photo Courtesy of www.only-carz.com

Fans of The Simpsons will know The Homer, the car that Homer Simpson designed along with his brother, who happened to be the owner of Powell Motors. This episode (from Season 2) was written as a spoof on the Edsel, which we all know ended sadly. In this episode, Homer designs “The Homer” which brings his brother’s car company to ruin.

Car Classes from the 1960s

Car Classes from the 1960s

'69 Plymouth Road RunnerToday’s automotive lingo includes car classes like exotic, luxury, compact, and sporty – to name a few. Even though most people can name at least one car that would fit into each of these modern category, these categories have not always been. The 1960s was the first decade to see a wide variety of different cars and the categories from the 1960 were quite different than the ones used today. In the 1960s, drivers could pick from pony cars, muscle cars, economy cars, and executive cars.

The Muscle Car and Pony Car

Bury a Belvedere

Bury a Belvedere

'66 Plymouth BelvedereIn 1957, the people of Tulsa, Oklahoma buried a Plymouth Belvedere of the same year. Fifty years later the car dubbed, “Miss Belvedere,” was unearthed. The car was buried into a cement tomb and would be awarded to the person who guessed the population of Tulsa in 2007. The man who won the contest died in 1979 and his prize was given to his sisters who were in their 80s and 90s when they learned they won the car.

Zombie Car Covered in Rust

1966 Plymouth Valiant Signet Hardtop

1966 Plymouth Valiant Signet Hardtop

1966 Plymouth Valiant The Plymouth Valiant brought the Chrysler car company great success in the 1960s and 1970s. Chrysler intended for the Valiant to be part of the growing compact segment, and it sold well in the U.S. as well as in foreign markets. The 1966 Plymouth Valiant Signet hardtop was one of the models in the second generation that ran from 1963 to 1966.

1966 Plymouth Valiant The 1966 Plymouth Valiant Signet hardtop originated at the start of the second generation of Valiants with the 1963 Signet hardtop coupe. This little compact was sporty and stylish, and a major competitor for the Ford Falcon and Chevy Corvair. While the latter received only mild face lifts for 1963, Chrysler remade the Valiant and created the well-received Signet.

So Long Superbird: No NASCAR for You

So Long Superbird: No NASCAR for You

SuperbirdChrysler decided that 1970 was the year of the NASCAR racers. Plymouth had the Superbird and Dodge had the Daytona. These two cars were designed with the hopes that Chrysler would design a car like the Daytona for Richard Petty, who was driving a Plymouth at the time. Unfortunately, since Chrysler could not meet Petty’s demands, he left to drive for Ford. Chrysler took control of their own NASCAR destiny and then created the Plymouth Superbird.

Production Rules in Place

Plymouth and the History of the Name

Plymouth and the History of the Name

'66 Plymouth FuryIn 1928, Chrysler decided to create a low-price name badge to compete with powerhouses Ford and Chevrolet. The idea was that this line would have features that the other low-priced badges did not. The badge that Chrysler created was Plymouth, which lasted until 2001 when DaimlerChrysler decided to end the brand due to low sales.

Not Named for the Town, but for Farmers’ Twine

1971 Plymouth GTX

1971 Plymouth GTX

1968 Plymouth GTXThe last model of the nameplate, the 1971 Plymouth GTX was the quintessential American muscle car. Plymouth was already famous for offering the public affordable pony and muscle cars with its Barracuda and Road Runner models. The GTX launched the brand into the performance stratosphere. The original 1967 GTX was a package for the Belvedere, and its subdued styling gave no indication of the power under the hood or the masterful engineering.

Road Runner in Music Videos

Road Runner in Music Videos

'69 Plymouth Roadrunner Who doesn’t love listening to their favorite music while cruising in their favorite car? Since music and cars have gone together for many decades, it is only appropriate that musicians include their favorite cars in their music videos. The iconic Plymouth Road Runner is one car that has appeared in music videos from several of the most popular musicians from a wide variety of genres.

1971 Plymouth Barracuda

1971 Plymouth Barracuda

FossilCars.com CustomerPart of the third and final generation of the nameplate, the 1971 Plymouth Barracuda came with several changes as compared to its predecessors. The original Barracuda came out in 1964 was an A-body, fastback coupe that shared its styling and body with the Plymouth Valiant. The Barracuda came out just as Americans were craving small, sporty coupes, and anything similar to the namesake of the pony car, Ford’s ever-popular Mustang.