Category Archives: Classic Cars

Chevy Bel Air Crash Test

Chevy Bel Air Crash Test

Chevy Bel Air

Photo Courtesy of www.59classicchevy.com

What do you get when you crash a 1959 Chevy Bel Air into a 2009 Chevy Malibu? You get an important history lesson.

In a publicity stunt in 2009, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) decided to show how far car safety has come in 50 years. They put a 2009 Malibu and a 1959 Chevy Bel Air in a head to head 40-MPH offset crash. After watching the 100-second video, viewers can easily see the progress that carmakers have made in the half of a century since the 1959 Bel Air hit the roads.

Carlynn Clean Classics

Carlynn Clean Classics

Mustang Mach 1Like so many successful classic car businesses, Carlynn Clean Classics began as a hobby that only grew more serious over the years. Today, the company is licensed and bonded and has set up shop in Florida to offer other passionate car enthusiasts the ability to search for that next dream car or find a new home for an old favorite, all while getting each customer the best possible price.

Classic Car Insurance

Classic Car Insurance'66 GTOIf you own a classic car or an antique car, you have an expensive hobby. Taking care of that car, or cars if you have a collection, takes time and money. To protect your hobby and your investment, having insurance is essential. A typical insurance policy, like one you would get for your newer car that you use regularly is not a great option for a special car. You really need to get classic car insurance to ensure that you get the best protection.

The Landau Roof

The Landau Roof

 Plymouth BarracudaIn the 1970s and the 1980s, the landau top was a popular, yet confusing design style. But, the original use of the word landau is quite different. It was originally a reference to a carriage and the term is still used in the United Kingdom when referencing the royal carriages. In the 1950s, the Nash Rambler actually came with a removeable landau top that slid back from the windshield and stowed away in the trunk. If you drove past the Rambler with the landau removed, you might not even notice because of the unusual look. Later, the landau was a style design that took the place of the C-pillars in the rear of the car. In the 1970s and 1980s, the landau top became synonymous with a fake convertible. These were some of the cars that wore the landau top with some sort of pride:

Streetside Classics Now Open in Phoenix

Streetside Classics Now Open in Phoenix

PhoenixThe growing Streetside Classics family continues to expand and offer more locations to better serve their car-loving customers. The latest location for Streetside recently opened in Mesa, Arizona, just minutes from downtown Phoenix. The Phoenix showroom joins the original location in Charlotte, as well as showrooms in Atlanta, Dallas/Fort Worth, Tampa, and Nashville.

Founder Donna Robbins opened the original Charlotte showroom in 2008 after ten years in the business of buying and selling classic cars. She set out with a working philosophy of always putting customers first and driven by a passion for collectible cars and never looked back. Robbins and her team now have one of the biggest sales volumes for collector cars in the country.

Ford at the Le Mans Race

Ford at the Le Mans Race 1964 Ford GT40The Le Mans race is the oldest continuous car race and has been going on since 1923, other than 1936 and the years between 1940 and 1948 due to World War II. Racing teams keep their car going for 24 hours as drivers drive prestigious and fast cars for two hours at a time. They rest for two hours and then get back to it again. Most recent changes have changed the teams from two drivers to three drivers. The race has been held in Le Mans, France and is always scheduled in the summer. 1954 JaguarOver the nearly 90 years of racing, the majority of winning automobiles have been made by European carmakers. In the first ten years of the race, the majority of winners were cars made by Bentley or Alfa Romeo. In the 1950s, the majority of winners were manufactured by Ferrari or Jaguar. The winners seemed to flip-flop between cars made in Italy and in the UK, until the late-1960s, when Ford GT40 models were back-to-back winners for four straight years. The Ford GT40 was the first American-made car to win the Le Mans. After the four Ford GT40 wins, the only other American-made entry was a McLaren F1 GTR in 1995. The first year that the Ford GT40 won, it did not just win, but a GT40 finished in first, second, and third place. The winning drivers in 1966 included Bruce McLaren a driver from New Zealand and Chris Amon. The following year, AJ Foyt and Dan Gurney took first, with McLaren’s team coming up in fourth. In 1968, only one Ford GT40 finished in the top 10 and it was raced by Pedro Rodriguez and Lucien Bianchi. In its final year of racing, the 1969 winning team included Jacky Ickx and Jackie Oliver. A second Ford GT40 finished in third place that year. Interestingly, two of the GT40 drivers, AJ Foyt and Jacky Ickx, were some of the most successful drivers in the history of the Le Mans races. Foyt won three times, which was exactly how many times he participated in the race. Ickx won six times.

959

959

Porsche 959

Photo Courtesy of Auto Week

A true supercar of the 1980s, the Porsche 959 was created by the German car company to comply with regulations for FIA homologation. The 959 was a part of what many fans deem the Golden Age of rally racing, Group B. To satisfy rules for racing the 959 in Group B, Porsche needed to make at least 200 street-legal units. The result was the fastest road-ready car in the world at the time. Porsche ended up making 337 of these cars between 1986 and 1989.

Porsche 959

Photo Courtesy of Car and Driver

Lincoln Mark II and Elizabeth Taylor

Lincoln Mark II and Elizabeth Taylor

Photo by Michael Kovac/Getty Images for Lincoln

Photo by Michael Kovac/Getty Images for Lincoln

In 2012 at the Los Angeles Auto Show, Lincoln did not have any new cars to display, since the future of the brand was in flux. So, the carmaker brought out a classic from the Golden Years of Hollywood and the heyday of automobiles. In 1956-1957, the Continental Lincoln Mark II was the most glamorous automobile available. It was built by hand and cost nearly $10,000, which was the equivalent of a Rolls Royce and a Bentley at the time.

944

944

'84 Porsche 944Porsche built its 944 model from 1982 to 1991. Sharing a platform with the 924, this new model didn’t quite replace it, as the 924 continued to be produced until 1988. The 944, in its turn, gave way to the 968. Porsche originally intended to keep it around well into the 1990s, but the updates made to the 924 in the early ‘90s were major and involved so many new parts that it ended up being rolled into the new model.

Unfortunately Named Cars

Unfortunately Named Cars

As a car fan, I enjoy learning about the significance of the names that cars are given. Many names have interesting etymologies. From the Corvette being named after swiftly moving Navy ships to the Shelby Cobra being named after a dangerous snake, many car makers get the names just right. Then there are cars like the Plymouth Duster, Ford Probe, and the Chevy Nova. These cars have names that are easy to spell, easy to say, but they have no sense of coolness at all.

'70 Plymouth Duster