Category Archives: Collectible Car

Cars that Moved Brands

Cars That Moved Brands

'56 Nash RamblerSome car names are just too good to stay within one brand. While it is impossible to consider the Mustang ever belonging to a carmaker other than Ford or a Corvette not being a Chevy, there are a few car models that have switched to other makers. Most of the name switches did not take place overnight, but many involved the defunct AMC along with cars in the Mopar lineup. Here are some of the notable switches:

The Ford Falcon

Many people consider the Ford Falcon to be among the most popular muscle cars in American History. Why? The Falcon not only enjoyed huge success upon its release, but it also gave owners and car enthusiasts something to be proud of and to talk about for generations to come. Though this particular model was produced between 1960-1970, the word Falcon was originally used for a 1935 model that Edsel Ford had designed. The name and design didn’t last, and it eventually morphed into the Mercury instead.

Where Do the Car Names Come From?

Where Do the Car Names Come From?

Bel Air. Corvette. Nova. Delray. Car manufacturers have worked hard to create memorable names and for the most part, they have succeeded. But, where do those names originate? In many cases, the names are often taken from foreign languages, places, and science.

1955 Chevy Bel AirOne of the most iconic cars of all time is actually named after a speedy warship. The Chevy Corvette shares the same name with a small, lightly armed warship. Most corvettes were and are still used by foreign navies, but there were some that were used by the United States Navy during World War II. It only seems appropriate that the fastest production car is named after another speedy object.

The 1970 GSX

Buick GSX1970 GSX: As one of the Top 10 Muscle Cars of All Time, the Buick 1970 GSX has certainly carved its place in American motor history. In the years preceding this particular model, General Motors had limited itself to a 400 cid engine. However, by the time 1970 rolled around, the desire for a little more power under the hood was finally too much to bear, and GM lifted the limit. In the GSX, a GS 455 V-8 replaced the 400 cid V-8.

1953 Buick Super

Buick Super: Today, not much in the way of auto companies remains in the heart of Michigan. Back in the day, though, it was the place to go, whether you were looking to start life anew with a new job or hoping to visit a sort of mecca for car manufacturers, all over the country. In the early 1950s, as the post-war economy boomed, consumers were out in flocks, purchasing anything and everything. They bought anything from new kitchen appliances, new homes to put those appliances in and even new cars. Buick was ready and taking full advantage of their new-found buying power.

Ellingson Motorcars

Ellingson Motorcars

Ellingson MotorcarsLocated just outside of Minneapolis in Rogers Minnesota, Ellingson Motorcars is one of the top dealerships in the Midwest for collectible, antique, and classic cars. Sell a car on consignment, search for and buy your dream car, and get your classic serviced here. Ellingson does it all. 

Ellingson is one of the largest consignment dealers in the region for classic cars. The showroom where your vehicle will be displayed is climate-controlled and fully modern. Combine this with an extensive network of classic car enthusiasts, collectors, and dealers, this is a great way to get the best deal for your sale. 

Hanksters Hot Rods and Muscle Cars

Hanksters Hot Rods and Muscle Cars

Hanksters Showrooms
Hanksters is a dream come true for muscle car and hot rod enthusiasts. With two locations and an online searchable inventory, it’s easy to buy, sell, and even finance here. Whether you want to expand your collection, have a specific car in mind, or need to let one of your cars go, Hanksters can help. 

Gary Hankinson has been working with classic cars for decades. For nearly 30 years he has worked on building and repairing, buying and selling hot rods, muscle cars, motorcycles, and other classic vehicles. Along with an expert staff, he has the knowledge and experience to make buying and selling a breeze. 

The Plymouth GTX

70 Plymouth GTXThe Plymouth GTX was an American muscle car produced from 1967-1971. The 1967 Plymouth GTX, originally launched as the Belvedere GTX, shared it’s basic body design with the stylish Plymouth Belvedere. It was seen as a “gentleman’s muscle car” for it’s combination of muscle car power and built-for-comfort street car design. The stock engine for the GTX was the “Super Commando 440,” a 375 horsepower monster made by Plymouth. The state-of-the-art MOPAR 425 horsepower 426 Hemi engine was available as an upgrade.

1965 Chevelle SS

1965 Chevelle SS

65 Chevrolet Chevelle SSThe Chevelle, first introduced in 1964, was Chevy’s answer to the Ford Fairlane. A mid-sized, mid-priced car, the Chevelle proved to be popular for its entire run. One thing that made it such a good seller for the company is the fact that it came in so many different varieties. In the ‘60s, buyers could get nearly any body style, and could choose from low-end to high-end trim levels. And, of course, the Chevelle also included a performance package, the Super Sport.

Pontiac Revived: The Chieftain

Pontiac Revived: The Chieftain

1950 Pontiac Chieftain When World War II had come and gone, many car companies were looking for new car designs to boost their sales to the pre-World War II levels. Pontiac was no different from this.  They decided on a vehicle that was much like their lower level Streamliner in terms of engine, dimensions, trim level and options, but it would use the sportier GM A-Body style instead of the B-Body style of the Streamliner.  This vehicle was called the Pontiac Chieftain and it rose to its expectations by replacing the Torpedo as Pontiac’s top automobile in its first year.