Category Archives: Collectible Cars

The Boss 429

Ford MustangWhen looking back at the history of muscle cars, one model stands out in American car-making: the 1969 Boss 429 Mustang. Though originally intended to compete with the Corvette, the Boss didn’t quite live up to Ford’s high hopes, and was discontinued relatively quickly after production continued from 1969 to 1970.

Each vehicle was hand assembled at the Kar Kraft facility in Brighton, Michigan. Production numbers were low, making each of the only 859 units just a little more special. In fact, some say that the Boss 429 may be the most valuable muscle car built in the 1960s because of its rarity.

Dodge Challenger Then and Now

As a well-respected car that has lasted through generations, the Dodge Challenger has endured its fair share of changes over the years. So how is it different now? Let’s take a look.

The first model, the 1970 Dodge Challenger, came with a whopping eight body styles, including convertible and hardtop versions, both with two doors. A variety of engine options was available for those who craved a little extra speed with this muscle car. Additionally, a dual exhaust could be had on some models. Four different hood styles were offered, though the standard style was almost flat, except for the small peak that ran down the center of the hood. For a flashier model, metallic paint colors were available alongside their flat color options. The 1970 Dodge Challenger (standard) featured a 225 cubic inch engine with a three-speed manual transmission.

1969 Charger Hemi 426

1969 Charger Hemi 426

The Charger was Dodge’s entry into the muscle car segment and it was made on Chrysler’s B platform, based on the Chrysler Cordoba and the Dodge Coronet. In 1966, the first Charger rolled off the line and came with many engine options. One was the powerful 426-cubic inch Hemi V8. The new muscle car from Dodge was the perfect vessel in which to showcase this large, high-performance Hemi. In that first year, just 468 cars were produced with the big engine.

The 5 Most Rare Factory-built Muscle Cars

Most car enthusiasts know that some of the most rare cars in the world were special ordered with very specific requests and that hundreds of thousands of dollars were spent to make them that way.  The cars that were factory-made, but still incredibly rare, get casted in the shadows because they are considered not as glamorous and sold for less money.  This article wants to commend these rare, factory-built vehicles and bring them out into the spotlight they deserve.

Driving In A Winter Wonderland

The first snows have fallen across the country, parents everywhere have dragged out the kids’ snow gear, and people have been heard far and wide grumbling about the frost so stubbornly clinging to the windshield. Though this time of year can be filled with extra cheer, beautiful views, and plenty of old family memories, we’re sad to say it also means it’s time to “winterize” all the great classic, sporty cars and store them safely in Grandma’s garage, nestled safely away from the bustling cities…over the river, and through the woods, of course!

Defining the Gentleman’s Muscle Car

Defining the Gentleman’s Muscle Car

1968 Plymouth GTXIf you have ever looked for information about the Plymouth GTX, odds are that you have seen the car named as the “Gentleman’s Muscle Car.” This left me wondering what a gentleman’s muscle car is and what type of men should be driving the other muscle cars.

According to my research, a gentleman’s muscle car is a refined muscle car with sleek design. This is in contrast to the rugged muscle cars that were for the drivers who did not need to go to work in their business attire. The original Plymouth GTX was created in 1967 under the Belvedere brand. A belvedere is an architectural feature that is designed to look upon a pleasant view, which seems fitting for the original name of the muscle car designed for gentlemen.

The 5 Fastest Muscle Cars

The 5 Fastest Muscle Cars

The smell of rubber burning and exhaust spewing, the scream of tires grinding against pavement and the crowd cheering on their favorite, and the heat and sweat of a summer night filled with adrenaline – that, my friend, is a drag race.

While everyone likes an exhilarating and exciting drag race, seeing no one in front of you when the checkered flag is flashed, holding the coveted trophy or just the having bragging rights shows you are the winner, you have the fastest car – everyone lusts for a taste of that!  That is why I bring you the Top 5 Fastest Muscle Cars according to Muscle Car Review Magazine, ranked based on their elapsed time on a quarter-mile track.

Rare Bird Sighting: The Plymouth Superbird

Plymouth Superbird
One of the better stories to come out of the American automobile industry during the latter portion of the 1960s is that of the Plymouth Road Runner. What’s not to like about a real muscle car that could get the quarter mile in under 14 seconds while setting you back less than three grand? Plus, as a bonus, you get a car that is named after one of your favorite cartoon characters. How can you beat that?

The First Generation Dodge Challenger

Dodge ChallengerThe original Dodge Challenger, produced from 1970-1974, was Dodge’s attempt at entering the popular pony car market, epitomized by the Ford Mustang. The Challenger shared its Chrysler E-body platform with the Plymouth Barracuda, although it was slightly larger. Chrysler-Dodge intended the Challenger to compete with the more luxurious pony cars of the time. Unfortunately for the company, by the time the Challenger’s design was complete, it was a bit late and the pony car wave was already beginning to fade. For this reason, it did not have nearly the success that the Chrysler brain trust had hoped for.

All-American Muscle: The Pontiac GTO

Pontiac GTOOne of the jobs of automotive designers is to look into the crystal ball and try to see into the future. What will attract the public as times change and a new generation of drivers are ready to hit the roadways? The history of the automobile manufacturing industry is filled with hits and misses as the “swamis” of automotive engineering placed their bets on educated guesses that became the next wave of motor vehicles offered by their respective companies.