Category Archives: Collectible Cars

The Fast American Production Cars

The Fast American Production Cars

Buick Gran Sport
Many people think you have spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on European exotics to get a fast ride. If you love good ol’ American cars, there are plenty of options available that will take you from zero to sixty in a nail-biting speed. These are a few of the fastest cars ever to come out of an American assembly line:

From Old to New: The Mustang and The Camaro

From Old to New: The Mustang and The Camaro

Photo Courtesy of Motor Trend

How many things can you name that have the ability to go from young to old?  That would seem to be a dream come true as we fight age, wrinkles, weight-gain and hair loss.  This dream has become a reality for two major car companies for the 2012 production year:  Ford and Chevrolet.

1970 Firebird Formula

1970 Firebird Formula

 Firebird Formula

Photo Courtesy of Mecum

The 1970 Firebird Formula 400 was the third of four models in Pontiac’s 70s Firebird lineup. The first generation of Firebirds, from ’67 to ’69, were closely related to their cousins the Camaros, but also took styling cues from the GTO. Although Pontiac designers had hoped to make a two-seater sports car modeled after the Banshee, a mid-60s concept car, the higher ups at General Motors feared that it would compete too heavily with the Corvette. The Firebirds represented a compromise, but one that disappointed few.

1964 Thunderbolt

1964 Thunderbolt

1964 Thunderbolt In the mid ‘60s Ford was struggling to keep up with the muscle cars and drag racers coming from Dodge, Plymouth, and Pontiac. To get back in the game, Ford created a limited edition, experimental, drag racing only version of the Fairlane. This was the 1964 Thunderbolt. The big engine that Ford put in the Galaxie at the time did not give that big, heavy car enough power to get up and go race with the other muscle cars, so they crammed it into the smaller Fairlane.

7 of the Most Popular Classic Cars

7 of the most popular classic cars

Before buying or selling a classic car, an important factor to consider is its popularity for a number of reasons. Popularity could indicate the odds of selling the car if that is the intention- certainly it is easier to sell something that is in demand. At the same time, however, when buying a classic car, a popular car can make it difficult to find parts, and prices typically reflect that. Indeed, it can be much more expensive to repair a popular classic car. Aside from buying and selling, though, it’s just plain interesting to learn about some of the most popular cars. Here’s a list of 7 of the most popular classic cars. Drum roll, please!

Carroll Shelby’s “Other Car” – The Sunbeam Tiger

Some people dream of getting their hands on one of the brilliantly designed cars by Carroll Shelby, but their dreams fall short when they look at the price tag of his famous Cobras or Mustangs.  There is good news for them; Mr. Shelby designed the Rootes Group Sunbeam Tiger, as well! In 1964, the Rootes Group was looking for a way to revamp the Sunbeam Alpine’s image from a “touring” car to a “sports car/roadster”.  They wanted the car to be modeled after the recently successful Shelby Cobra.  After some research and the decision to use the Ford’s 164hp 4.3L Windsor V8 engine, who was better to ask to design their car than the man himself, Carroll Shelby?  Shelby agreed to design the car for $10,000.  His prototype, along with the prototype built by racer and previous employee of Shelby America, Ken Miles, were sent to England for production.

The Boss 429

Ford MustangWhen looking back at the history of muscle cars, one model stands out in American car-making: the 1969 Boss 429 Mustang. Though originally intended to compete with the Corvette, the Boss didn’t quite live up to Ford’s high hopes, and was discontinued relatively quickly after production continued from 1969 to 1970.

Each vehicle was hand assembled at the Kar Kraft facility in Brighton, Michigan. Production numbers were low, making each of the only 859 units just a little more special. In fact, some say that the Boss 429 may be the most valuable muscle car built in the 1960s because of its rarity.

Dodge Challenger Then and Now

As a well-respected car that has lasted through generations, the Dodge Challenger has endured its fair share of changes over the years. So how is it different now? Let’s take a look.

The first model, the 1970 Dodge Challenger, came with a whopping eight body styles, including convertible and hardtop versions, both with two doors. A variety of engine options was available for those who craved a little extra speed with this muscle car. Additionally, a dual exhaust could be had on some models. Four different hood styles were offered, though the standard style was almost flat, except for the small peak that ran down the center of the hood. For a flashier model, metallic paint colors were available alongside their flat color options. The 1970 Dodge Challenger (standard) featured a 225 cubic inch engine with a three-speed manual transmission.

1969 Charger Hemi 426

1969 Charger Hemi 426

The Charger was Dodge’s entry into the muscle car segment and it was made on Chrysler’s B platform, based on the Chrysler Cordoba and the Dodge Coronet. In 1966, the first Charger rolled off the line and came with many engine options. One was the powerful 426-cubic inch Hemi V8. The new muscle car from Dodge was the perfect vessel in which to showcase this large, high-performance Hemi. In that first year, just 468 cars were produced with the big engine.

The 5 Most Rare Factory-built Muscle Cars

Most car enthusiasts know that some of the most rare cars in the world were special ordered with very specific requests and that hundreds of thousands of dollars were spent to make them that way.  The cars that were factory-made, but still incredibly rare, get casted in the shadows because they are considered not as glamorous and sold for less money.  This article wants to commend these rare, factory-built vehicles and bring them out into the spotlight they deserve.