Category Archives: Collectible Cars

1971 Chevy Monte Carlo

You may recognize this muscle car from the thrilling opening sequence of the popular movie The Fast and the Furious 3: Tokyo Drift, or you may simply be a fan of the old Chevys, but there is no disputing that the 1971 Chevrolet Monte Carlo holds a special place in the hearts of car enthusiasts.

1971 Chevy Monte CarloThe Monte Carlo was first debuted in 1969 as an answer to the Ford Thunderbird and has since seen five generations of production. The 1971 model sold for $3416 and included verticle, slimmer headlights in comparison to the previous model, but also featured a stand-up hood ornament and an optional four-spoke steering wheel. It had a V8 engine, rear-wheel drive, and coupe style, though it was largely unchanged from the 1970 model. At first, however, sales on this model got off to a slow start due to strikes.

10 of the Most Famous Cars in Movies

10 of the Most Famous Cars in Movies

What classic car enthusiast doesn’t love watching a movie with a wild, rip-roaring chase scene or a loud, growling drag race? What car aficionado doesn’t pay more attention to the car and its specs in a movie rather than the plot? Here we are going to pay homage to those movie-watching car lovers by taking a look at 10 of the Most Famous Cars in Movies.

10. 1972 Ford Gran Torino – Gran Torino (2008):

Plymouth and the History of the Name

Plymouth and the History of the Name

'66 Plymouth FuryIn 1928, Chrysler decided to create a low-price name badge to compete with powerhouses Ford and Chevrolet. The idea was that this line would have features that the other low-priced badges did not. The badge that Chrysler created was Plymouth, which lasted until 2001 when DaimlerChrysler decided to end the brand due to low sales.

Not Named for the Town, but for Farmers’ Twine

How to Ship a Classic Car

How to Ship a Classic Car

Auto TransportIf you want to appreciate human ingenuity you can never go wrong with a proper classic car. Such vehicles remind us of a time when things were built to last. They show us that beauty, utility and tenacity can all go together to create an actual piece of art.

1971 Chevy Chevelle SS

1971 Chevy Chevelle SS

412340-0-lgThe 1971 Chevy Chevelle SS was part of the second generation of Chevy’s muscle cars. When the Chevelle line came into being in 1964, GM hoped it could be competitive with the Ford Fairlane and that it would be a reintroduction of the size and concept of the popular ’55 to ’57 models from Chevrolet. Throughout their run, the Chevelles were available as sport coupes, sport sedans, convertibles, and even wagons.

1967 Corvette

1967 Corvette
1967 Chevrolet CorvetteThe Chevrolet Corvette is the classic American sports car and its popularity, styling, and performance have never been matched by another car. The 1967 Corvette brought up the rear of the second generation that began in 1963. In 1953, the first Corvette, a convertible designed by Harley Earl came out at the GM Motorama as a concept car. This kicked off the first generation or the C1 line of Corvettes, also known as the solid-axle models for their lack of independent rear suspension.

1970 Cuda 440

1970 Cuda 440

Cuda 440The 1970 Cuda 440 was just one member of the well-loved line of Barrcuda muscle cars produced by Plymouth from 1964 to 1974. The first generation of Barracudas ran from 1964 to 1966. They were based on the body of the Plymouth Valiant. From 1967 to 1969, the second generation cars were still Valiant-based, but totally redesigned and available in convertible, fastback, and notchback body styles.

The Rebirth of the Convertible

The Rebirth of the Convertible

Cadillac EldoradoIt may not seem like it today, but there was a time when no automaker made a convertible. In the 1970s, the Federal Government decided that convertibles were not safe. In 1976, General Motors announced that Cadillac Eldorado would be the last convertible to roll of the of the assembly line. After decades of making convertibles, the drop top came to a stop.

Pontiac GTO: Some History

Pontiac GTO: Some History

When you talk about the great American muscle cars of the 1960s and beyond one of the first vehicles that is going to enter the conversation is the Pontiac GTO.

A lot of people have heard of John DeLorean as the founder of the DeLorean Motor Company, the ill-fated luxury car manufacturer of the 1970s. However, DeLorean was long thought of as an automotive design genius before starting his own company.

He was the chief engineer of the Pontiac division of General Motors in the early 1960s and he was instrumental in the design of the GTO along with chassis expert Bill Collins and engine man Russell Gee.

Code Name “Panther”

Code Name “Panther”

1967 Chevy Camaro

The Ford Mustang had an extraordinary impact on the automotive industry after its release in April of 1964.

As you might expect, the other major automobile manufacturers immediately got to work on their versions of a pony car so that they could garner their share of this burgeoning new market.

1967 Chevrolet CamaroIn 1965 rumors began to circulate about the Chevrolet division of General Motors developing a competitor under the code name “Panther”.