Category Archives: Collectible Cars

The 1966 Dodge Charger

The 1966 Dodge Charger

'66 Dodge ChargerThe “Leader of the Dodge Rebellion” was introduced at the 1966 Rose Bowl, and although the Dodge brothers didn’t know it at the time, the 1966 Charger would impact muscle car history forever.

'66 Dodge ChargerThe Charger was built off of the Dodge Coronet chassis, but utilized its own body. This introduction was Dodge’s first fastback, high-speed street racer. The 1966 Charger was the first U.S. production vehicle to boast a spoiler, which was implemented to solve the lift that its body created. David Pearson drove a #6 Cotton Owens-prepared Charger, and won the NASCAR Grand National championship in 1966 (in addition to 14 other first-place finishes).

Pontiac Revived: The Chieftain

Pontiac Revived: The Chieftain

1950 Pontiac Chieftain When World War II had come and gone, many car companies were looking for new car designs to boost their sales to the pre-World War II levels. Pontiac was no different from this.  They decided on a vehicle that was much like their lower level Streamliner in terms of engine, dimensions, trim level and options, but it would use the sportier GM A-Body style instead of the B-Body style of the Streamliner.  This vehicle was called the Pontiac Chieftain and it rose to its expectations by replacing the Torpedo as Pontiac’s top automobile in its first year.

The Yenko Camaro

The Yenko Camaro

Photo Courtesy of hotrod.com

The Camaro has long been associated with speed, power, and respect on the road, however, there was a time when it simply could not compete with the Ford Mustang and Plymouth Barracuda. At the time that the Camaro was first produced, General Motors had a limit which prevented using an engine larger than a 400 cubic inch V8, much unlike its competition, which had no such restriction. Things changed under Don Yenko, who understood that there was a market for more powerful cars, and so began the story of the Yenko Camero, a modified version of the famous car line, produced under Yenko Chevrolet.

The Top 6 Cars To Restore

Cars to Restore:

63 Buick Riviera 1) 1963-65 Buick Riviera– though parts for this model may be more expensive because they are in high demand among car restorers, some companies are beginning a new reproduction of them, which may mean the price will begin to drop slightly on those parts. As time passes, this car is increasingly more popular as one of the better cars to restore.

2) 1953-54 Chevrolet Bel Air– classic car enthusiasts love this model for many reasons, but we can all appreciate relatively low prices on parts. Everything from mechanical and electrical parts as well as upgrade options for added performance are generally inexpensive, comparatively speaking.

Nearly Forgotten: Plymouth Superbird

70 Plymouth SuperbirdWhen Plymouth unveiled the Road Runner in 1968, the response was overwhelmingly positive and it still remains among the most popular of muscle cars. Because of its success, it was only natural that Plymouth attempted to up the ante shortly following its release. The Plymouth Superbird came along in 1970 and it served as a modified version of the ever-popular Road Runner. It was built with the intent to appear in the NASCAR circuit, and as a part of the NASCAR rules, there had to be street-legal versions of this beauty.

A Look Inside Jay Leno’s Garage

Photo Courtesy of motor1.com

Jay Leno is not only one of the most successful talk show hosts in the history of network television; he is also an avid car collector. He maintains a garage in Southern California housing over 200 fine collector cars and motorcycles. Leno has a passion for automobiles and does not simply house them as museum pieces; you can catch him tooling around the So Cal area in a different car, every day of the week.

The First Personal Luxury Car: Ford’s Thunderbird

The First Personal Luxury Car: Ford’s Thunderbird

1955 Ford ThunderbirdThe ultimate American personal luxury car of the heyday of the Big Three had to be the Cadillac Eldorado, but the very first of the breed was the Ford Thunderbird. The car went into development in 1953 as competition for the new Chevy Corvette as a sporty two-seat convertible, and by 1954 the first prototype was introduced at the Detroit Auto Show, in February; by September of ’54 the T-Bird went into production. The first 1955 Ford Thunderbird models were offered to the public by the end of October that same year.

The Durable Dodge Dart

The Durable Dodge Dart

1966 Dodge Dart If you were a young driver looking for an inexpensive used car in the late 1970s, your elders were invariably going to recommend that you try to find yourself an old Dodge Dart. Now these sixties-vintage Darts were not going to turn many heads or have any cheerleaders asking you for a ride home, but they were reliable, durable, economical, and easy to repair.

1965 Pontiac Catalina

As an elongated low-riding model, the 1965 Pontiac Catalina offered many options from color and performance to engine upgrades. The full size two-door hardtop and convertible versions of the Catalina had the ability to use Pontiac’s 421 cid engine, despite the infamous General Motors ban on engines larger than 400 cid. The ban was in effect for intermediate vehicles, allowing the Catalina to skirt the rule because of its status as a full-size vehicle. This fastback further impressed with the addition of the “2+2” package option, which included the bigger engine among a handful of other upgrades. This option was phased out only 2 years later, in 1967, because it simply didn’t achieve the overwhelming successes of the GTO.

3 of the Most Unique American-Built Cars

3 of the Most Unique American-built Cars

54 1954 pontiac bonneville special

There have been many unique cars built that each has their own interesting characteristics.  Three of these cars are classics built in America during the 1940’s and 50’s; we’d like to take the time to showcase them today.