Category Archives: Plymouth

1969 Barracuda

1969 Barracuda

1969 Barracuda The 1969 Barracuda came at the end of the second generation of Plymouth’s pony car which lasted from just 1967 to 1969. Chrysler introduced the Barracuda in 1964 as sporty performance cars were really gaining popularity in the U.S. 1974 was the last year for the model. In the early ‘70s, performance cars went downhill thanks to stricter safety and emission regulations. The Barracuda was one of many casualties.

Based on the Valiant A-body, the 1969 Barracuda and the other members of the second generation came in fastback, notchback, and convertible body styles. They also received significant restyling as compared to the previous generation of models from 1964 to 1966.

Nearly Forgotten: Plymouth Superbird

70 Plymouth SuperbirdWhen Plymouth unveiled the Road Runner in 1968, the response was overwhelmingly positive and it still remains among the most popular of muscle cars. Because of its success, it was only natural that Plymouth attempted to up the ante shortly following its release. The Plymouth Superbird came along in 1970 and it served as a modified version of the ever-popular Road Runner. It was built with the intent to appear in the NASCAR circuit, and as a part of the NASCAR rules, there had to be street-legal versions of this beauty.

Plymouth and the History of the Name

Plymouth and the History of the Name

'66 Plymouth FuryIn 1928, Chrysler decided to create a low-price name badge to compete with powerhouses Ford and Chevrolet. The idea was that this line would have features that the other low-priced badges did not. The badge that Chrysler created was Plymouth, which lasted until 2001 when DaimlerChrysler decided to end the brand due to low sales.

Not Named for the Town, but for Farmers’ Twine

1972 Plymouth Duster

1972 Plymouth Duster

Oh, the 1970s. Some of us remember them fondly, while others see bad fashion choices looking back through the picture frame. As with anything, there were good moments and bad, highlights and less exciting moments. In the early 1970s, Plymouth was excited to add a little something exciting to one of its models. The Plymouth Duster made its appearance in 1970 as a compliment to the existing Plymouth Valiant. The Duster served as the performance version of the classic car, the Valiant.

Defining the Gentleman’s Muscle Car

Defining the Gentleman’s Muscle Car

1968 Plymouth GTXIf you have ever looked for information about the Plymouth GTX, odds are that you have seen the car named as the “Gentleman’s Muscle Car.” This left me wondering what a gentleman’s muscle car is and what type of men should be driving the other muscle cars.

According to my research, a gentleman’s muscle car is a refined muscle car with sleek design. This is in contrast to the rugged muscle cars that were for the drivers who did not need to go to work in their business attire. The original Plymouth GTX was created in 1967 under the Belvedere brand. A belvedere is an architectural feature that is designed to look upon a pleasant view, which seems fitting for the original name of the muscle car designed for gentlemen.

The Landau Roof

The Landau Roof

 Plymouth BarracudaIn the 1970s and the 1980s, the landau top was a popular, yet confusing design style. But, the original use of the word landau is quite different. It was originally a reference to a carriage and the term is still used in the United Kingdom when referencing the royal carriages. In the 1950s, the Nash Rambler actually came with a removeable landau top that slid back from the windshield and stowed away in the trunk. If you drove past the Rambler with the landau removed, you might not even notice because of the unusual look. Later, the landau was a style design that took the place of the C-pillars in the rear of the car. In the 1970s and 1980s, the landau top became synonymous with a fake convertible. These were some of the cars that wore the landau top with some sort of pride:

Unfortunately Named Cars

Unfortunately Named Cars

As a car fan, I enjoy learning about the significance of the names that cars are given. Many names have interesting etymologies. From the Corvette being named after swiftly moving Navy ships to the Shelby Cobra being named after a dangerous snake, many car makers get the names just right. Then there are cars like the Plymouth Duster, Ford Probe, and the Chevy Nova. These cars have names that are easy to spell, easy to say, but they have no sense of coolness at all.

'70 Plymouth Duster

Malaise Era: Definition and Examples

Malaise Era: Definition and Examples

'74 Apollo Buick Malaise: This word comes from the combination of French words mal- and aise (which translates to ease). This word generally means a sense of being uneasy or feeling out of sorts. It usually involves the beginning of an illness or feeling less that healthy. The term “malaise” has come to designate the decade of cars produced between 1973 and 1983.

Cars that Disappointed

Cars that Disappointed

1981 DeloreanIn the world of automobiles, there are hits and misses. Usually the hits last for many years, like the Chevy Corvette, Chevy Camaro, and the Ford Mustang. When the misses arrive, they may not be immediately evident, but eventually, someone will discover the flaws. These are a few of the most disappointing cars to ever hit the showrooms floors:

1961 Chevy Corvair. This car was a hit at first. Who didn’t want a modern looking car that got great gas mileage and was fun to drive? Unfortunately, the car that was designed to compete with the popular VW Beetle was loaded with design flaws. From the dangerous steering mechanisms to the fumes that would leak from the heating unit, the Corvair was a stinker disguised in an adorable package.

1968 Plymouth Belvedere

1968 Plymouth Belveder

1968 Plymouth Belevedere

The 1968 Plymouth Belvedere came close to the end of the life for this model, which Chrysler produced from 1954 to 1970. The first incarnation of the model was the 1951 to 1953 Cranbrook Belvedere. The two-door hardtop came out to compete with the Chevy Bel Air. As was always intended for the Plymouth name, this version of the Cranbrook was a low-cost car. In fact, it was the first, affordable two-door hardtop to come out of Detroit.