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The Plymouth Fury

The Plymouth Fury

There is a certain mindset that seems to come along with ushering in a brand-new year. Perhaps the first thing that comes to mind is the hard-core reveling that is done by many people. Partying hard to welcome the new year ...
Third Generation Plymouth Barracudas

Third Generation Plymouth Barracudas

Of all the classic cars that are out there people who have a specific affection for Plymouth automobiles often gravitate toward the Barracuda. A lot of people think that the first pony car was the Ford Mustang, and it is true ...
Plymouth & The Great Depression

Plymouth & The Great Depression

The history of the automobile industry is intertwined with the history of our country from the period just preceding the turn of the 20th century onward. Motor vehicles started to become more of a reality and less of a dream during ...
The Plymouth Plaza

The Plymouth Plaza

 In 1954, Plymouth rolled out the Plymouth Plaza, which they priced under their more pricey models, while offering options that had been reserved for those more expensive models. The Plaza came in 2, 3, and 4 door sedan versions. A ...
1964 Plymouth Valiant

1964 Plymouth Valiant

As the 1960s moved along, cars slowly transformed from the "bubble" looking designs of the 1950s, and became more angular and elongated. Power under the hood increased, and so did speed. The Plymouth Valiant was no exception to this. Introduced ...

Winged Warriors of the NASCAR Circuit

Winged Warriors of the NASCAR Circuit

'70 Plymouth SuperbirdAsk any child between the ages of 12 and 3 who “The King” is and he will immediately direct you to the Disney-Pixar movie “Cars” and a blue 1970 Superbird that is designed to look just like the one driven by Richard Petty. The King is a talking car, voice by Petty himself, and it also wears his racing number, 43. The Cars character was incredibly popular with children who fell in love with the movie and the anthropomorphic cars, and it brought back the love for the Winged Warriors that rocked NASCAR for a few short glory-filled years.

Paint Colors from the Muscle Car Era

Paint Colors from the Muscle Car Era

1969 Chevrolet NovaIn the Muscle Car era from the late 1960s and early 1970s, cars came standard in some highly unusual colors. Today, most American drivers choose cars in black, silver, or white, but they  might splurge at pick a car in race car red or bumblebee yellow. Even if it seems like the yellow or red cars are bold and risky, they are nothing compared to the choices that automakers used forty-plus years ago.

Malaise Era: Definition and Examples

Malaise Era: Definition and Examples

'74 Apollo Buick Malaise: This word comes from the combination of French words mal- and aise (which translates to ease). This word generally means a sense of being uneasy or feeling out of sorts. It usually involves the beginning of an illness or feeling less that healthy. The term “malaise” has come to designate the decade of cars produced between 1973 and 1983.

1971 Plymouth GTX

1971 Plymouth GTX

1968 Plymouth GTXThe last model of the nameplate, the 1971 Plymouth GTX was the quintessential American muscle car. Plymouth was already famous for offering the public affordable pony and muscle cars with its Barracuda and Road Runner models. The GTX launched the brand into the performance stratosphere. The original 1967 GTX was a package for the Belvedere, and its subdued styling gave no indication of the power under the hood or the masterful engineering.

1968 Plymouth Belvedere

1968 Plymouth Belveder

1968 Plymouth Belevedere

The 1968 Plymouth Belvedere came close to the end of the life for this model, which Chrysler produced from 1954 to 1970. The first incarnation of the model was the 1951 to 1953 Cranbrook Belvedere. The two-door hardtop came out to compete with the Chevy Bel Air. As was always intended for the Plymouth name, this version of the Cranbrook was a low-cost car. In fact, it was the first, affordable two-door hardtop to come out of Detroit.

1964 Plymouth Valiant

As the 1960s moved along, cars slowly transformed from the “bubble” looking designs of the 1950s, and became more angular and elongated. Power under the hood increased, and so did speed. The Plymouth Valiant was no exception to this. Introduced in 1960, the Valiant was not considered to be a Plymouth model until 1961.

After a record year in sales in 1963,, the changes for the 1964 model were more focused on performance and reliability than its outward appearance, though it did feature a restyled front end. Horizontal bars, a Valiant medallion, and a new grille gave the 1964 model a new look. Additionally, Taillights were rotated so that they were vertical rather than horizontal.

The Plymouth Plaza

 In 1954, Plymouth rolled out the Plymouth Plaza, which they priced under their more pricey models, while offering options that had been reserved for those more expensive models. The Plaza came in 2, 3, and 4 door sedan versions. A “Silver Special” Plaza was rare, and only offered in 1958. This special edition Plaza had silver paint on the roof and a stainless steel spear on the front fenders and part of the doors. A  few other final touches to the model made it one of the rarest classic cars, especially because there is no true way to know just how many silver specials were produced.

Plymouth & The Great Depression

The history of the automobile industry is intertwined with the history of our country from the period just preceding the turn of the 20th century onward.

Motor vehicles started to become more of a reality and less of a dream during the end of the 1800s, and automobile ownership was brought within reach of ordinary Americans with the introduction of the Ford Model T in 1908.

During the earlier days of automotive manufacturing there were a couple of events that had a big impact on the evolution of the industry.

Third Generation Plymouth Barracudas

Of all the classic cars that are out there people who have a specific affection for Plymouth automobiles often gravitate toward the Barracuda.

A lot of people think that the first pony car was the Ford Mustang, and it is true that the class of vehicle was named after the Mustang. However, the Barracuda, which was considered to be a pony car once the term was coined was introduced first. The Plymouth Barracuda was released on April 1 of 1964 which predated the debut of the Ford Mustang by a couple of weeks.

The Plymouth Fury

There is a certain mindset that seems to come along with ushering in a brand-new year. Perhaps the first thing that comes to mind is the hard-core reveling that is done by many people.

Partying hard to welcome the new year is a tradition for a lot of folks and as long as it is done responsibly there is certainly nothing wrong with knocking back a few potent potables with your friends and family.