Category Archives: Sports Car

Winged Warriors of the NASCAR Circuit

Winged Warriors of the NASCAR Circuit

'70 Plymouth SuperbirdAsk any child between the ages of 12 and 3 who “The King” is and he will immediately direct you to the Disney-Pixar movie “Cars” and a blue 1970 Superbird that is designed to look just like the one driven by Richard Petty. The King is a talking car, voice by Petty himself, and it also wears his racing number, 43. The Cars character was incredibly popular with children who fell in love with the movie and the anthropomorphic cars, and it brought back the love for the Winged Warriors that rocked NASCAR for a few short glory-filled years.

Paint Colors from the Muscle Car Era

Paint Colors from the Muscle Car Era

1969 Chevrolet NovaIn the Muscle Car era from the late 1960s and early 1970s, cars came standard in some highly unusual colors. Today, most American drivers choose cars in black, silver, or white, but they  might splurge at pick a car in race car red or bumblebee yellow. Even if it seems like the yellow or red cars are bold and risky, they are nothing compared to the choices that automakers used forty-plus years ago.

Malaise Era: Definition and Examples

Malaise Era: Definition and Examples

'74 Buick Apollo Malaise: This word comes from the combination of French words mal- and aise (which translates to ease). This word generally means a sense of being uneasy or feeling out of sorts. It usually involves the beginning of an illness or feeling less that healthy. The term “malaise” has come to designate the decade of cars produced between 1973 and 1983.

1971 Plymouth GTX

1971 Plymouth GTX

1968 Plymouth GTXThe last model of the nameplate, the 1971 Plymouth GTX was the quintessential American muscle car. Plymouth was already famous for offering the public affordable pony and muscle cars with its Barracuda and Road Runner models. The GTX launched the brand into the performance stratosphere. The original 1967 GTX was a package for the Belvedere, and its subdued styling gave no indication of the power under the hood or the masterful engineering.

1968 Plymouth Belvedere

1968 Plymouth Belveder

1968 Plymouth Belevedere

The 1968 Plymouth Belvedere came close to the end of the life for this model, which Chrysler produced from 1954 to 1970. The first incarnation of the model was the 1951 to 1953 Cranbrook Belvedere. The two-door hardtop came out to compete with the Chevy Bel Air. As was always intended for the Plymouth name, this version of the Cranbrook was a low-cost car. In fact, it was the first, affordable two-door hardtop to come out of Detroit.