Get Your Hands on a Piece of Design Mastery: The Pontiac Torpedo

Get Your Hands on a Piece of Design Mastery: The Pontiac Torpedo

41 Pontiac TorpedoIn the early days of automobiles, General Motors was the king of the road. The company reigned supreme because of the high quality manufacturing procedures and the unique personalities that designers gave to each brand division and name plate. The reign during the early decades between the 1930s and 1960s rested on the shoulders of one man, and one man only: Harley Earl.

Earl and The Midas Touch

Everything that Mr. Earl touched turned to gold for General Motors. Harley Earl began his rule of General Motors as an early member of the Art and Color division, which was like the ugly stepsister of the company. Prior to Earl’s ideas, the company had no concern for automotive design – the priority at the time was only on function. In 1937, this simple design guy became a Vice President and he quickly initiated the idea that GM still uses today: that new design models must be released annually. This decision made customers feel the need to update their cars as the new designs were released, because no one wanted to be caught with an outdated model.

Long Lasting Series of Firsts

The annual design change model made Harley Earl a star at GM and he continued to shine for many more years. Just two years later, he created the very first concept car: The Buick Y-Job. This car showed GM customers what designs were on the horizon and customers loved what he showed them.

Concept Car Turning Dreams into Reality

56 Buick SpecialThe Y-Job included several features that defined General Motors vehicles for the next 15 years. Pontiacs, Buicks, Cadillacs, and Chevrolets all had the rounded fenders, wraparound bumpers, fancy grilles, and gunsight hood ornaments. It is impossible to get your hands on the Y-Job because there is only one, but there are several other cars that were designed in 1940s that resembled the Y-Job, but with less futuristic style.

Own an Affordable Harley Earl Design

The Pontiac Torpedo from the 1940s is a perfect example of a Y-Job spin-off. Classic car buffs who want a car designed by Harley Earl can spend a fortune on other iconic designs like Chevy Corvettes and the 1948 Cadillac Series 61, but the Pontiac Torpedo is much more affordable. The car was available in so many body styles, from a two-door convertible and four-door station wagon to a two-door fastback and four-door business sedan. Because of the affordability, many Torpedos were sold which means there are many places to find parts for restoration projects.

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Get Your Hands on a Piece of Design Mastery: The Pontiac TorpedoGet Your Hands on a Piece of Design Mastery: The Pontiac TorpedoDecember 12, 2013
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The Pontiac Torpedo from the 1940s is a perfect example of a Y-Job spin-off. The car was available in so many body styles, from a two-door convertible and four-door station wagon to a two-door fastback and four-door business sedan. The Pontiac Torpedo from the 1940s is a perfect example of a Y-Job spin-off. The car was available in so many body styles, from a two-door convertible and four-door station wagon to a two-door fastback and four-door business sedan.

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One Response to Get Your Hands on a Piece of Design Mastery: The Pontiac Torpedo

  1. jack says:

    The Pontiac Torpedo would look even more streamlined with some matching rear fender skirts and horizontal trim.

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