Tag Archives: Buick

The 1970 GSX

Buick GSX1970 GSX: As one of the Top 10 Muscle Cars of All Time, the Buick 1970 GSX has certainly carved its place in American motor history. In the years preceding this particular model, General Motors had limited itself to a 400 cid engine. However, by the time 1970 rolled around, the desire for a little more power under the hood was finally too much to bear, and GM lifted the limit. In the GSX, a GS 455 V-8 replaced the 400 cid V-8.

1953 Buick Super

Buick Super: Today, not much in the way of auto companies remains in the heart of Michigan. Back in the day, though, it was the place to go, whether you were looking to start life anew with a new job or hoping to visit a sort of mecca for car manufacturers, all over the country. In the early 1950s, as the post-war economy boomed, consumers were out in flocks, purchasing anything and everything. They bought anything from new kitchen appliances, new homes to put those appliances in and even new cars. Buick was ready and taking full advantage of their new-found buying power.

The Buick GSX

Buick GSXWho says that a Buick has to be a car “your grandparent would drive”?  The 1970 Buick GSX is anything but that; in fact, it is said to be a direct competitor of the Pontiac GTO Judge. With its famous black stripe with outlining red pin stripes over the standard rear spoilers and its partially blackened hood with mounted tachometer and black front spoiler, who could possibly mistake this car for anything but what it is:  An All American Muscle Car.

The Top 6 Cars To Restore

Cars to Restore:

63 Buick Riviera 1) 1963-65 Buick Riviera– though parts for this model may be more expensive because they are in high demand among car restorers, some companies are beginning a new reproduction of them, which may mean the price will begin to drop slightly on those parts. As time passes, this car is increasingly more popular as one of the better cars to restore.

2) 1953-54 Chevrolet Bel Air– classic car enthusiasts love this model for many reasons, but we can all appreciate relatively low prices on parts. Everything from mechanical and electrical parts as well as upgrade options for added performance are generally inexpensive, comparatively speaking.

A Look Inside Jay Leno’s Garage

Photo Courtesy of motor1.com

Jay Leno is not only one of the most successful talk show hosts in the history of network television; he is also an avid car collector. He maintains a garage in Southern California housing over 200 fine collector cars and motorcycles. Leno has a passion for automobiles and does not simply house them as museum pieces; you can catch him tooling around the So Cal area in a different car, every day of the week.

Defining the Gentleman’s Muscle Car

Defining the Gentleman’s Muscle Car

1968 Plymouth GTXIf you have ever looked for information about the Plymouth GTX, odds are that you have seen the car named as the “Gentleman’s Muscle Car.” This left me wondering what a gentleman’s muscle car is and what type of men should be driving the other muscle cars.

According to my research, a gentleman’s muscle car is a refined muscle car with sleek design. This is in contrast to the rugged muscle cars that were for the drivers who did not need to go to work in their business attire. The original Plymouth GTX was created in 1967 under the Belvedere brand. A belvedere is an architectural feature that is designed to look upon a pleasant view, which seems fitting for the original name of the muscle car designed for gentlemen.

Malaise Era: Definition and Examples

Malaise Era: Definition and Examples

'74 Apollo Buick Malaise: This word comes from the combination of French words mal- and aise (which translates to ease). This word generally means a sense of being uneasy or feeling out of sorts. It usually involves the beginning of an illness or feeling less that healthy. The term “malaise” has come to designate the decade of cars produced between 1973 and 1983.

Choice Pre-War Cruisers

Choice Pre-War Cruisers

Lincole ZephyrThere is something magical about the cars that were sold between World War I and World War II. The “pre-war” look was heavy, but aerodynamic, masculine, but rather sexy, too. This art-deco look also known as the “coffin cars” will never be replicated and the rock-solid construction was and still is, second-to-none. There were some pre-war styles that did reappear during the post-war era, but as soon as the automakers got their production capabilities back to normal, their cars began to take on a different look. These are a few of the choice pre-war cars that define the era:

High Tech Lo Tech: Concept Cars from 1969

High Tech Lo Tech: Concept Cars from 1969

Buick Century Cruiser - Photo Courtesy of oldconceptcars.com

Buick Century Cruiser – Photo Courtesy of oldconceptcars.com

General Motors was on a roll in the 1960s, with muscle cars and cars inspired by the space race. The biggest automaker in the world ended the decade with concept cars that took imagination and innovation to an entirely new level. These cars looked more like space ships than speed demons and they were created with idea of where technology could take us when we were on the roads.

The Deuce and a Quarter: Slang for the Car Enthusiasts

The Deuce and a Quarter: Slang for the Car Enthusiasts

1962 Buick ElectraCars have earned their place in the hearts of their drivers. In the United States, it seems that as soon as something becomes special to us, we give it pet names. Those pet names then turn into slang terms, which evolve as they spread around the country. Cars have had their fair share of memorable slang terms.