Tag Archives: Fossilcars

The Ford Falcon

Many people consider the Ford Falcon to be among the most popular muscle cars in American History. Why? The Falcon not only enjoyed huge success upon its release, but it also gave owners and car enthusiasts something to be proud of and to talk about for generations to come. Though this particular model was produced between 1960-1970, the word Falcon was originally used for a 1935 model that Edsel Ford had designed. The name and design didn’t last, and it eventually morphed into the Mercury instead.

1969 Ford Mustang

1969 Ford Mustang

1969 Mustang Mach 1Among the many celebrated muscle cars, and indeed cars in general, in American car history is the Ford Mustang. Classified as a pony car, this is a car which has enchanted generations of car lovers and even casual car enthusiasts, and has epitomized American automotive pride. Today, the Mustang remains a symbol of power and respect on the road, and still, millions of people around the world appreciate this head-turner. With the first generation Mustang (1964-1973) came the beginning of the muscle car era, and indeed, it signified the beginning of the American love affair with fast cars. Though Ford’s competitors also began to produce their own muscle cars, many did not stand the test of time like the Mustang.

The Plymouth Road Runner

The Plymouth Road Runner

1971 Road RunnerThe muscle car era was still in full swing when the Plymouth Road Runner was introduced for the 1968 model year, but many aficionados felt as though the whole ethos of the true muscle car was being lost. The original idea at the core of the muscle car was to provide a vehicle that was basic in appearance, options and appointments so that the majority of the money spent on the car went into improving its performance. The end result was a vehicle that packed a lot of punch under the hood that was at the same time affordable to most consumers. And this would especially include younger buyers who wanted the speed but may not have had a lot of money to spend to get it. As the sixties progressed, the industry started to stray from this formula by offering more complicated cars with additional bells and whistles that subsequently carried larger price tags.

The Plymouth Barracuda

1969 BarracudaIn 1964, the Plymouth division of Chrysler rolled out a new 2-door: The Plymouth Barracuda. The car lasted a full decade before being discontinued and saw many changes in its short life. Throughout the evolution of the Barracuda, this pony car was Chrysler’s attempt to join the ranks of the Ford Mustang, at a time when American demand for sporty compact cars was becoming even more insatiable. Though it sold far fewer units than the Mustang, it was a valiant effort by Chrysler.

1953 Buick Super

Buick Super: Today, not much in the way of auto companies remains in the heart of Michigan. Back in the day, though, it was the place to go, whether you were looking to start life anew with a new job or hoping to visit a sort of mecca for car manufacturers, all over the country. In the early 1950s, as the post-war economy boomed, consumers were out in flocks, purchasing anything and everything. They bought anything from new kitchen appliances, new homes to put those appliances in and even new cars. Buick was ready and taking full advantage of their new-found buying power.

The Chevrolet Chevelle SS

The Chevrolet Chevelle SS

64 Chevrolet ChevelleChevrolet got a lot of mileage out of the Chevelle series in the 1960s, offering everything from soup to nuts under the name Chevelle. In a very real sense, the Chevelle line could have been a brand in and of itself capable of meeting the needs of most consumers with one car or another. Let’s look at the 1968 model year as an example. They made the Chevelle 300, which was a two-door coupe; the 300 Deluxe, offered as a two-door coupe and either a two or four-door sedan; the Nomad and Nomad Deluxe wagons; the Chevelle Concours Estate wagon; the Chevelle Malibu in five different variations; the Chevelle Malibu Sport; and the muscular Chevelle Super Sport, or “SS.”

Is It a Car or a Truck?

Is It a Car or a Truck?

 

66 Chevrolet El CaminoDuring the heyday of automobile manufacturing in the United States, the”Big Three” of American automobile manufacturing endeavored to offer something for everyone. Engendering brand loyalty was a big part of their marketing strategy, and these companies didn’t want to lose customers because a competitor was offering a type of vehicle that they were not. Ford and General Motors were more inclined than Chrysler to engage in this tit for tat, and General Motors usually had the edge because they would often times design a competing vehicle from more than one of their divisions. For example, after the stunning success that Ford had with the Mustang, General Motors countered with the Chevy Camaro as well as the Pontiac Firebird.

1967 Chevelle

1967 Chevelle

1967 Chevrolet ChevelleAs one of the most popular classic cars, the 1967 Chevrolet Chevelle is highly sought-after among car enthusiasts. Both the coupe and convertible versions are popular. The 1967 Chevelle model had a slightly more aggressive look than the previous year’s model because of a reworked bumper. In this post, we’ll take a look at the classic Chevrolet.

1958 Plymouth Fury

1958 Plymouth Fury

58 Plymouth Fury

Photo Courtesy of mecum.com

As one of the most famous movie cars, the 1958 Plymouth Fury has an intimidating look that causes people to turn heads, to this day. Stephen King brought extra fame to the car in his book Christine, which later adapted into a movie. In the story, Christine is the name of a possessed vehicle that takes over her owner, Arnie.

When the car was released, it came with a price tag of $3,032, making it the most expensive Plymouth, for that model year. The V8 engine that produced 225 horsepower at 4,400 rpm. The two door hardtop had a three speed manual transmission. Only 5,303 units were produced, which was significantly fewer than the previous model year.

Pontiac Revived: The Chieftain

Pontiac Revived: The Chieftain

1950 Pontiac Chieftain When World War II had come and gone, many car companies were looking for new car designs to boost their sales to the pre-World War II levels. Pontiac was no different from this.  They decided on a vehicle that was much like their lower level Streamliner in terms of engine, dimensions, trim level and options, but it would use the sportier GM A-Body style instead of the B-Body style of the Streamliner.  This vehicle was called the Pontiac Chieftain and it rose to its expectations by replacing the Torpedo as Pontiac’s top automobile in its first year.