Tag Archives: Fossilcars

Carroll Shelby’s “Other Car” – The Sunbeam Tiger

Some people dream of getting their hands on one of the brilliantly designed cars by Carroll Shelby, but their dreams fall short when they look at the price tag of his famous Cobras or Mustangs.  There is good news for them; Mr. Shelby designed the Rootes Group Sunbeam Tiger, as well! In 1964, the Rootes Group was looking for a way to revamp the Sunbeam Alpine’s image from a “touring” car to a “sports car/roadster”.  They wanted the car to be modeled after the recently successful Shelby Cobra.  After some research and the decision to use the Ford’s 164hp 4.3L Windsor V8 engine, who was better to ask to design their car than the man himself, Carroll Shelby?  Shelby agreed to design the car for $10,000.  His prototype, along with the prototype built by racer and previous employee of Shelby America, Ken Miles, were sent to England for production.

The Boss 429

Ford MustangWhen looking back at the history of muscle cars, one model stands out in American car-making: the 1969 Boss 429 Mustang. Though originally intended to compete with the Corvette, the Boss didn’t quite live up to Ford’s high hopes, and was discontinued relatively quickly after production continued from 1969 to 1970.

Each vehicle was hand assembled at the Kar Kraft facility in Brighton, Michigan. Production numbers were low, making each of the only 859 units just a little more special. In fact, some say that the Boss 429 may be the most valuable muscle car built in the 1960s because of its rarity.

Dodge Challenger Then and Now

As a well-respected car that has lasted through generations, the Dodge Challenger has endured its fair share of changes over the years. So how is it different now? Let’s take a look.

The first model, the 1970 Dodge Challenger, came with a whopping eight body styles, including convertible and hardtop versions, both with two doors. A variety of engine options was available for those who craved a little extra speed with this muscle car. Additionally, a dual exhaust could be had on some models. Four different hood styles were offered, though the standard style was almost flat, except for the small peak that ran down the center of the hood. For a flashier model, metallic paint colors were available alongside their flat color options. The 1970 Dodge Challenger (standard) featured a 225 cubic inch engine with a three-speed manual transmission.

Driving In A Winter Wonderland

The first snows have fallen across the country, parents everywhere have dragged out the kids’ snow gear, and people have been heard far and wide grumbling about the frost so stubbornly clinging to the windshield. Though this time of year can be filled with extra cheer, beautiful views, and plenty of old family memories, we’re sad to say it also means it’s time to “winterize” all the great classic, sporty cars and store them safely in Grandma’s garage, nestled safely away from the bustling cities…over the river, and through the woods, of course!

1970 Pontiac GTO

1970 Pontiac GTO

'70 Pontiac GTOImagine that today is a beautiful summer morning with the birds chirping, the sun shining, and the neighborhood kids already dragging out the sprinkler. You’ve taken a moment to enjoy your morning coffee on the porch, soaking in every last drop of sun you can, and you head to the garage. This story doesn’t end with a lawnmower or even gardening tools, no, this is something better. You open the garage door and step back, taking a second to enjoy the sight of your 1970 Pontiac GTO. Upon starting the engine, you can’t help but smile when you hear it roar to life before turning it off, popping the hood, and spending the next few hours, just…tinkering. Any little bit of fine-tuning you can justify, you’ll do. After all, what’s a bright summer’s day without a good muscle car?!

1949 Willys Jeepster

There’s something about a Jeep, and anyone who owns one, whether it’s a classic car or not, would definitely agree. There’s nothing like driving down the road and spotting another Jeep, and knowing the subtle wave both drivers exchange can be explained in one quick phrase: “it’s a Jeep thing.” The story of the Jeep begins long ago, and there have been several different Jeep models over the years.

1957 Ford Thunderbird

1957 Ford Thunderbird

1957 Thunderbird Among classic car restorers, the “good ol’ days” of the 1950s provide some of the best classic cars to work on. One such vehicle is the 1957 Ford Thunderbird. The concept for the Ford Thunderbird began in 1953 as a response to the ever-popular Chevrolet Corvette, and while both are popular, there are certainly things about the Thunderbird that will always set it apart from the Corvette. The Thunderbird itself was on the production line from 1955-1997, and then again from 2002-2005 as a personal luxury vehicle, even though the idea had come about years before Ford began production on the Thunderbird.

1925 Chevrolet Series K Superior

Oh, the Roaring 20s. They were a time of prosperity and relative calm, as the world continued its celebration of the end of the War to End All Wars, though a rumbling was quietly creeping into the world again. Until the depths of the Great Depression reared their ugly head a few years later, the United States enjoyed a few care-free years, and auto companies capitalized on that. Chevrolet was excited to roll out its 1925 Series K Superior, and customers were excited to enjoy its many improvements from other models. Focusing on these improvements, Chevrolet was proud to spotlight the many improvements this model had over its predecessor, the 1924 Series F Superior.

The Datsun Revival

The Datsun is a car model which existed years before it gained popularity here in the United States. Originating in 1931 under the DAT Motorcar Co., this nameplate was spelled differently and was largely popular in Japan. It wasn’t until after World War II that the car made its debut in the States. Although it would become known as an economy car , yet a classy one, the logo for the Datsun was based on the Japanese flag, which features a red circle in the middle of a white flag.

1958 Oldsmobile Super 88

As the United States auto companies began to embrace more futuristic looks of the late 1950s and early 1960s, due in large part to the beginning of the country’s fixation on outer space, chrome started to make its appearance more and more. The 1958 Oldsmobile Super 88 was also called the “Chrome Mobile” because of the sheer amount of chrome on the body. The entry level Super 88, the Dynamic 88, ran from 1958-1966, and like the Super, it also had its fair share of chrome. For now, we’ll focus on the 1958 Oldsmobile Super 88.