Tag Archives: General Motors

Sloan-Longway Museum: Worth a Visit

Sloan-Longway Museum: Worth a Visit

1972 Buick SkylarkFlint, Michigan: The motherland of General Motors. In the 1960s, Flint could brag that it had the highest per capita income of any in the world, but this is no longer the case. There are a few remnants of the day, like the largest brownfield zone in the United States; this zone was once the flourishing Buick city plant. At one point, over 80,000 people worked for General Motors in Flint alone, now there are fewer than 4,000. People leave the city to find a new home every single day. The Great Recession has taken its toll on Flint, but it has not destroyed the Sloan-Longway Museum.

High Tech Lo Tech: Concept Cars from 1969

High Tech Lo Tech: Concept Cars from 1969

Buick Century Cruiser - Photo Courtesy of oldconceptcars.com

Buick Century Cruiser – Photo Courtesy of oldconceptcars.com

General Motors was on a roll in the 1960s, with muscle cars and cars inspired by the space race. The biggest automaker in the world ended the decade with concept cars that took imagination and innovation to an entirely new level. These cars looked more like space ships than speed demons and they were created with idea of where technology could take us when we were on the roads.

Long Live the Last Dealership

Long Live the Last Dealership

'66 International ScountIf you have ever wondered what happened to dealerships after automotive brands shuttered, you no longer have to wonder. In many cases, the dealerships either close or adopt a new brand. When Oldsmobile stopped production in 2004, dealerships took on Buicks or GMC instead. You will be hard pressed to find any Oldsmobile dealerships anywhere in the United States and the same goes for Pontiac dealerships, too. Those dealerships expired in October 2010. While General Motors seems to have a stronghold on the status of its shuttered brands, other manufacturers were not so tight fisted.

Chevy Master Deluxe

Master Deluxe

1938 Chevy Master DeluxeMoving into the 1940s was a good year for Chevy. As the decade switched to 1940, General Motors sold car number 25 million moving the large car manufacturer ahead of Ford Motor Company. One of the biggest reasons that Ford moved into second place in 1940 was due to the fact that cars were advancing past the coach-look of the Model-T into the integrated sedan-look of the Chevy Master Deluxe. Ford just could change with the times fast enough.

Serious Collectible: Select 60 Buick Reatta

Serious Collectible: Select 60 Buick Reatta

1990 Buick ReattaOne little known car in the collectible world is the Buick Reatta Select 60. All of the Buick Reatta models were made by hand, making each of the more than 21,000 cars special to General Motors and to their owners. These luxury sports cars were made for just a few short years, between 1988 and 1991. While the majority of the Buick Reatta models are overly collectible, there are a few select ones – called Select 60 – that truly are.

Special Models for a Select Group of Dealers

Pontiac Tempest: Tempest to GTO

Pontiac Tempest: Tempest to GTO

66 Pontiac TempestWhen the Pontiac division of General Motors closed a few years ago, car buffs could not believe the brand that changed the face of automotive history would no longer be in existence. The automaker had been in dire straits before, but pulled out of it to become one of the most popular car makers in the world. Many were frustrated that Pontiac was not given the chance to do it again.

The Rebirth of the Convertible

The Rebirth of the Convertible

51 Cadillac ConvertibleIt may not seem like it today, but there was a time when no automaker made a convertible. In the 1970s, the Federal Government decided that convertibles were not safe. In 1976, General Motors announced that Cadillac Eldorado would be the last convertible to roll of the of the assembly line. After decades of making convertibles, the drop top came to a stop.

Get Your Hands on a Piece of Design Mastery: The Pontiac Torpedo

Get Your Hands on a Piece of Design Mastery: The Pontiac Torpedo

41 Pontiac TorpedoIn the early days of automobiles, General Motors was the king of the road. The company reigned supreme because of the high quality manufacturing procedures and the unique personalities that designers gave to each brand division and name plate. The reign during the early decades between the 1930s and 1960s rested on the shoulders of one man, and one man only: Harley Earl.

Earl and The Midas Touch

Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme

Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme

OldsmobileThe Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme is one of the classic nameplates from the legendary brand that lasted for over 100 years. The mid-sized Cutlass Supreme came out in 1966 and lasted for five generations, through 1997 when the Intrigue replaced all of the Cutlass models.

The first Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme was a trim level in 1966, for the hardtop, four-door sedan. The high-level Supreme trim included a plush interior with a bench and armrest, new, deluxe door panels, and full wheel covers. This first Supreme was also known as the Holiday Sedan. Just one year later, the Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme came into its own and the name represented a full series. The new line-up included a Holiday and a Sport Coupe, a convertible, and a Town Sedan. All members of the line were more luxurious than those in the Cutlass series.

Perry Mason and Classic Cars

Perry Mason and Classic Cars

58 Ford Fairlane 500 SkylinerPerry Mason is the detective show that started it all. The show debuted in 1957 and lasted until 1966. The television show was based on the collection of over 80 novels that sold over 135 million copies. Perry Mason, the hard working attorney, became the inspiration for detective shows like Bones, Dexter, CSI, and Criminal Minds. It also became an inspirational show for classic car collectors, especially those who work on authentic restorations. Collectors and restorers simply have to watch the DVDs to see what their favorite vintage cars looked like in mid-century years when the show was first released.