Tag Archives: NASCAR

Chevy 150

Chevy 150

Chevy 150
One of the banner years for automobiles, especially Chevys, was 1957. This year brought about some of the most iconic automobiles, as well as, congressional hearings that would change stock car racing forever.

Early NASCAR races were held on the beach at Daytona Beach, Florida and the last beach race was held in 1958. In the year before this final race, the United States Congress got involved in racing because of the fact that so many men and women were involved in reckless racing on public roads. Since so many manufacturers began selling cars like the Chevy 150 and the Ford Fairlane that could easily be modified into lightning-fast hot rods, street racing quickly became a problem in city neighborhoods and rural areas.

So Long Superbird: No NASCAR for You

So Long Superbird: No NASCAR for You

SuperbirdChrysler decided that 1970 was the year of the NASCAR racers. Plymouth had the Superbird and Dodge had the Daytona. These two cars were designed with the hopes that Chrysler would design a car like the Daytona for Richard Petty, who was driving a Plymouth at the time. Unfortunately, since Chrysler could not meet Petty’s demands, he left to drive for Ford. Chrysler took control of their own NASCAR destiny and then created the Plymouth Superbird.

Production Rules in Place

The Most Interesting Plymouths

The Most Interesting Plymouths

'70 Plymouth BarracudaIn 1928, Chrysler created the Plymouth lineup as their own low priced collection. Sadly for fans of the brand, Plymouth ceased producing cars in 2001. Over the years, there were several interesting Plymouth models that have become icons today.

1960 Plymouth Fury Sunstar: This cool convertible was one of the last winged beauties. It was a truly unique looking car with many unexpected features, like the rotating driver’s seat that allowed easy in and out of the car. With the hooded headlights, pointed tail lights, two-toned paint, and excessive chrome, this car defined the idea of “more is more.”

Winged Warriors of the NASCAR Circuit

Winged Warriors of the NASCAR Circuit

'70 Plymouth SuperbirdAsk any child between the ages of 12 and 3 who “The King” is and he will immediately direct you to the Disney-Pixar movie “Cars” and a blue 1970 Superbird that is designed to look just like the one driven by Richard Petty. The King is a talking car, voice by Petty himself, and it also wears his racing number, 43. The Cars character was incredibly popular with children who fell in love with the movie and the anthropomorphic cars, and it brought back the love for the Winged Warriors that rocked NASCAR for a few short glory-filled years.

Pontiac Tempest: Tempest to GTO

Pontiac Tempest: Tempest to GTO

66 Pontiac TempestWhen the Pontiac division of General Motors closed a few years ago, car buffs could not believe the brand that changed the face of automotive history would no longer be in existence. The automaker had been in dire straits before, but pulled out of it to become one of the most popular car makers in the world. Many were frustrated that Pontiac was not given the chance to do it again.

Nearly Forgotten: Plymouth Superbird

When Plymouth unveiled the Road Runner in 1968, the response was overwhelmingly positive and it still remains among the most popular of muscle cars. Because of its success, it was only natural that Plymouth attempted to up the ante shortly following its release. The Plymouth Superbird came along in 1970 and it served as a modified version of the ever-popular Road Runner. It was built with the intent to appear in the NASCAR circuit, and as a part of the NASCAR rules, there had to be street-legal versions of this beauty.

The Boss 429

When looking back at the history of muscle cars, one model stands out in American car-making: the 1969 Boss 429 Mustang. Though originally intended to compete with the Corvette, the Boss didn’t quite live up to Ford’s high hopes, and was discontinued relatively quickly after production continued from 1969 to 1970.

Each vehicle was hand assembled at the Kar Kraft facility in Brighton, Michigan. Production numbers were low, making each of the only 859 units just a little more special. In fact, some say that the Boss 429 may be the most valuable muscle car built in the 1960s because of its rarity.

The Chrysler 300

When people hear the vehicle name “Chrysler 300”, they are typically thinking about the near-luxury sedan that has become popular in the past dozen years or so.  What some people don’t realize, though most classic car enthusiasts do, the Chrysler 300 was originally released in 1955 and would become one of the muscle car industries ancestors.