Tag Archives: Pontiac

The Chevrolet Chevelle SS

The Chevrolet Chevelle SS

64 Chevrolet ChevelleChevrolet got a lot of mileage out of the Chevelle series in the 1960s, offering everything from soup to nuts under the name Chevelle. In a very real sense, the Chevelle line could have been a brand in and of itself capable of meeting the needs of most consumers with one car or another. Let’s look at the 1968 model year as an example. They made the Chevelle 300, which was a two-door coupe; the 300 Deluxe, offered as a two-door coupe and either a two or four-door sedan; the Nomad and Nomad Deluxe wagons; the Chevelle Concours Estate wagon; the Chevelle Malibu in five different variations; the Chevelle Malibu Sport; and the muscular Chevelle Super Sport, or “SS.”

Is It a Car or a Truck?

Is It a Car or a Truck?

 

66 Chevrolet El CaminoDuring the heyday of automobile manufacturing in the United States, the”Big Three” of American automobile manufacturing endeavored to offer something for everyone. Engendering brand loyalty was a big part of their marketing strategy, and these companies didn’t want to lose customers because a competitor was offering a type of vehicle that they were not. Ford and General Motors were more inclined than Chrysler to engage in this tit for tat, and General Motors usually had the edge because they would often times design a competing vehicle from more than one of their divisions. For example, after the stunning success that Ford had with the Mustang, General Motors countered with the Chevy Camaro as well as the Pontiac Firebird.

Pontiac Revived: The Chieftain

Pontiac Revived: The Chieftain

1950 Pontiac Chieftain When World War II had come and gone, many car companies were looking for new car designs to boost their sales to the pre-World War II levels. Pontiac was no different from this.  They decided on a vehicle that was much like their lower level Streamliner in terms of engine, dimensions, trim level and options, but it would use the sportier GM A-Body style instead of the B-Body style of the Streamliner.  This vehicle was called the Pontiac Chieftain and it rose to its expectations by replacing the Torpedo as Pontiac’s top automobile in its first year.

1962 Catalina

1962 Catalina

1962 CatalinaAlthough factory racing had been effectively banned starting in 1957, Pontiac’s late ‘50s and early ‘60s revamping included racing as a major component and the 1962 Catalina was a big part of that move. In the late ‘50s General Motors’ Pontiac brand began to feel a little old and tired. The cars were big, boring, and slow and not many young people were interested in them.

1962 CatalinaPontiac engineers made a turnaround of the brand by ignoring the racing ban and creating parts and packages that helped Pontiac models succeed in NHRA and NASCAR racing. The 1962 Catalina was a prime example of Pontiac’s cars that could be outfitted for racing and which helped to bring the cool back to the brand.

The Top 6 Cars To Restore

Cars to Restore:

63 Buick Riviera 1) 1963-65 Buick Riviera– though parts for this model may be more expensive because they are in high demand among car restorers, some companies are beginning a new reproduction of them, which may mean the price will begin to drop slightly on those parts. As time passes, this car is increasingly more popular as one of the better cars to restore.

2) 1953-54 Chevrolet Bel Air– classic car enthusiasts love this model for many reasons, but we can all appreciate relatively low prices on parts. Everything from mechanical and electrical parts as well as upgrade options for added performance are generally inexpensive, comparatively speaking.

1965 Pontiac Catalina

As an elongated low-riding model, the 1965 Pontiac Catalina offered many options from color and performance to engine upgrades. The full size two-door hardtop and convertible versions of the Catalina had the ability to use Pontiac’s 421 cid engine, despite the infamous General Motors ban on engines larger than 400 cid. The ban was in effect for intermediate vehicles, allowing the Catalina to skirt the rule because of its status as a full-size vehicle. This fastback further impressed with the addition of the “2+2” package option, which included the bigger engine among a handful of other upgrades. This option was phased out only 2 years later, in 1967, because it simply didn’t achieve the overwhelming successes of the GTO.

3 of the Most Unique American-Built Cars

3 of the Most Unique American-built Cars

54 1954 pontiac bonneville special

There have been many unique cars built that each has their own interesting characteristics.  Three of these cars are classics built in America during the 1940’s and 50’s; we’d like to take the time to showcase them today.

10 of the Most Famous Cars in Movies

10 of the Most Famous Cars in Movies

What classic car enthusiast doesn’t love watching a movie with a wild, rip-roaring chase scene or a loud, growling drag race? What car aficionado doesn’t pay more attention to the car and its specs in a movie rather than the plot? Here we are going to pay homage to those movie-watching car lovers by taking a look at 10 of the Most Famous Cars in Movies.

10. 1972 Ford Gran Torino – Gran Torino (2008):

Pontiac GTO: Some History

Pontiac GTO: Some History

When you talk about the great American muscle cars of the 1960s and beyond one of the first vehicles that is going to enter the conversation is the Pontiac GTO.

A lot of people have heard of John DeLorean as the founder of the DeLorean Motor Company, the ill-fated luxury car manufacturer of the 1970s. However, DeLorean was long thought of as an automotive design genius before starting his own company.

He was the chief engineer of the Pontiac division of General Motors in the early 1960s and he was instrumental in the design of the GTO along with chassis expert Bill Collins and engine man Russell Gee.

Early Muscle: 1961 Pontiac Ventura

Early Muscle: 1961 Pontiac Ventura

Pontiac VenturaIt is hard to pin down the first actual muscle car; some have asserted that it is the 1949 Oldsmobile Rocket 88, which was built with speed in mind, with an overhead valve V8 placed in a mid-size car with a relatively lightweight body. A lot of observers cite the next big step in the evolution of the early muscle car to be the introduction of the 1955 Chrysler C-300 with its 300 horsepower Hemi engine that could go from zero to sixty in 9.8 seconds and reach a top speed of around 130 miles per hour.