Tag Archives: Pony cars

Car Classes from the 1960s

Car Classes from the 1960s

'69 Plymouth Road RunnerToday’s automotive lingo includes car classes like exotic, luxury, compact, and sporty – to name a few. Even though most people can name at least one car that would fit into each of these modern category, these categories have not always been. The 1960s was the first decade to see a wide variety of different cars and the categories from the 1960 were quite different than the ones used today. In the 1960s, drivers could pick from pony cars, muscle cars, economy cars, and executive cars.

The Muscle Car and Pony Car

1968 Mercury Cougar

Occasionally, an automobile company has some trouble coming up with a completely unique vehicle unlike any others on the market. After all, if it’s not a good idea to reinvent the wheel, it can sometimes seem that way about cars that are selling. Add in regulations on things like emissions, and creating a completely new model becomes quite difficult. In the 1960s, the Mercury division of Ford was having some trouble with their originality, at least for some models. The Mercury Cougar is a classic car which was originally based on the Ford Mustang when it was first built in 1967. It would later come to resemble other models, such as the Thunderbird.

1970 Ford Mustang

Just because a car looks cool, that does not mean its performance is just as impressive. Others, though, bring the best of both worlds. The Ford Mustang often ranks on the lists of history’s most-popular muscle cars, and certainly the 1970 Ford Mustang is one of those that constantly excites classic and muscle car fans from around the world. This was a car which had probably had many engine options, giving drivers the ability to impress others on the road. Today, this model year is still a favorite at classic car shows and auctions. We’d be quite surprised if that changed anytime soon.

Code Name “Panther”

pantherPanther: The Ford Mustang had an extraordinary impact on the automotive industry after its release in April of 1964.

As you might expect, the other major automobile manufacturers immediately got to work on their versions of a pony car so that they could garner their share of this burgeoning new market.

In 1965 rumors began to circulate about the Chevrolet division of General Motors developing a competitor under the code name “Panther.”

During the summer of 1966 the company held a press conference and they invited members of the automotive journalism community. At this conference they announced that everyone in attendance was automatically a member of the “Society for the Elimination of Panthers from the Automotive World.”