Category Archives: Chrysler

Plymouth and the History of the Name

Plymouth and the History of the Name

'66 Plymouth FuryIn 1928, Chrysler decided to create a low-price name badge to compete with powerhouses Ford and Chevrolet. The idea was that this line would have features that the other low-priced badges did not. The badge that Chrysler created was Plymouth, which lasted until 2001 when DaimlerChrysler decided to end the brand due to low sales.

Not Named for the Town, but for Farmers’ Twine

1951 Chrysler Saratoga

1951 Chrysler Saratoga

1951 Chrysler SaratogaFrom 1939 to 1960, with a few interruptions, Chrysler used the Saratoga nameplate as first the most expensive, full-sized eight-cylinder model, then as the least expensive eight-cylinder, and finally somewhere in between. The 1951 Chrysler Saratoga was positioned at the bottom of the company’s eight-cylinder cars, but was also made available with the famous HemiV8 engine.

In 1951, Chrysler introduced the Hemi to replace the basic straight-eight that had been in place as far back as 1930. The Hemi was not meant to be a racing engine, but soon enough its high-performance capabilities were realized and cars like the 1951 Chrysler Saratoga were being used in road races and drag races and eventually on the stock car circuit.

So Long Superbird: No NASCAR for You

So Long Superbird: No NASCAR for You

SuperbirdChrysler decided that 1970 was the year of the NASCAR racers. Plymouth had the Superbird and Dodge had the Daytona. These two cars were designed with the hopes that Chrysler would design a car like the Daytona for Richard Petty, who was driving a Plymouth at the time. Unfortunately, since Chrysler could not meet Petty’s demands, he left to drive for Ford. Chrysler took control of their own NASCAR destiny and then created the Plymouth Superbird.

Production Rules in Place

The Forward Look Lineup and the Little Known Designer

The Forward Look Lineup and the Little Known Designer

'54 Plymouth BelvedereIn the race to build the biggest tail fins, Chrysler designers created the lineup of cars they dubbed “The Forward Look.” This style lasted from 1955-1961 and was created by Virgil Exner, who studied car design with the master, Harley Earl. These cars have a signature look that sets them apart from their General Motors competitors and continues to make them popular collectibles today.

Winged Warriors of the NASCAR Circuit

Winged Warriors of the NASCAR Circuit

'70 Plymouth SuperbirdAsk any child between the ages of 12 and 3 who “The King” is and he will immediately direct you to the Disney-Pixar movie “Cars” and a blue 1970 Superbird that is designed to look just like the one driven by Richard Petty. The King is a talking car, voice by Petty himself, and it also wears his racing number, 43. The Cars character was incredibly popular with children who fell in love with the movie and the anthropomorphic cars, and it brought back the love for the Winged Warriors that rocked NASCAR for a few short glory-filled years.

Walter P. Chrysler Museum

Walter P. Chrysler Museum

Chrysler MuseumThe Walter P. Chrysler Museum was a collection of antique, concept, and custom Chrysler vehicles as well as historical exhibits detailing the story of Chrysler and its contributions to the world of automotive technology, design, and innovation. The 55,000-square foot museum included three floors of displays and was located next to Chrysler Headquarters in Auburn Hills, Michigan. It is no longer open to the public.

Chrysler MuseumThe first floor of the Walter P. Chrysler Museum included a history of the first 50 years of the automotive industry from the perspective of Chrysler and its vehicles. This part of the museum’s collection included rare and early cars dating back to the very early 1900s. Nameplates on display here were Rambler, Hudson, Nash, Plymouth, DeSoto, and Willys-Overland.

1931 Chrysler Imperial CG

Smooth curvatures, graceful lines, and majestic colors define many of history’s most popular classic cars, and will likely contribute to the designs that will roll off the line for many years to come. During the Roaring 20s, Americans were enjoying the bliss and jubilation that followed the end to a traumatic war, World War I. For a time, it seemed as though extravagance was the new normal, and “new money” families were grappling to have the latest technology, the greatest cars, and more. The Chrysler Imperial was first introduced in 1926, and it certainly fit the bill as a great-looking car for stylish families across the country. By 1931, the market had crashed, and millions were struggling to make ends meet as Chrysler produced the 1931 Chysler Imperial CG.