Category Archives: Classic Cars

1958 Plymouth Fury

1958 Plymouth Fury

58 Plymouth Fury

Photo Courtesy of mecum.com

As one of the most famous movie cars, the 1958 Plymouth Fury has an intimidating look that causes people to turn heads, to this day. Stephen King brought extra fame to the car in his book Christine, which later adapted into a movie. In the story, Christine is the name of a possessed vehicle that takes over her owner, Arnie.

When the car was released, it came with a price tag of $3,032, making it the most expensive Plymouth, for that model year. The V8 engine that produced 225 horsepower at 4,400 rpm. The two door hardtop had a three speed manual transmission. Only 5,303 units were produced, which was significantly fewer than the previous model year.

1965 Chevelle SS

1965 Chevelle SS

65 Chevrolet Chevelle SSThe Chevelle, first introduced in 1964, was Chevy’s answer to the Ford Fairlane. A mid-sized, mid-priced car, the Chevelle proved to be popular for its entire run. One thing that made it such a good seller for the company is the fact that it came in so many different varieties. In the ‘60s, buyers could get nearly any body style, and could choose from low-end to high-end trim levels. And, of course, the Chevelle also included a performance package, the Super Sport.

1967 Dodge Dart Convertible

  1967 Dodge Dart Convertible

67 Dodge Dart

Photo Courtesy of hotrod.com

Most well-known as a compact car, the Dart actually began as a full-sized car for the Dodge brand in 1960. By 1962, it shrank to mid-sized, and was fully part of the compact niche by 1963. The 1967 Dodge Dart convertible kicked off the fourth generation of this popular model. The Dart went through a lot of changes in its early years and moved through generations one through three pretty quickly. As well as a reduction in size over those years, it slowly evolved from an affordable, safe family car to a genuine muscle car.

The 1966 Dodge Charger

The 1966 Dodge Charger

'66 Dodge ChargerThe “Leader of the Dodge Rebellion” was introduced at the 1966 Rose Bowl, and although the Dodge brothers didn’t know it at the time, the 1966 Charger would impact muscle car history forever.

'66 Dodge ChargerThe Charger was built off of the Dodge Coronet chassis, but utilized its own body. This introduction was Dodge’s first fastback, high-speed street racer. The 1966 Charger was the first U.S. production vehicle to boast a spoiler, which was implemented to solve the lift that its body created. David Pearson drove a #6 Cotton Owens-prepared Charger, and won the NASCAR Grand National championship in 1966 (in addition to 14 other first-place finishes).

Pontiac Revived: The Chieftain

Pontiac Revived: The Chieftain

1950 Pontiac Chieftain When World War II had come and gone, many car companies were looking for new car designs to boost their sales to the pre-World War II levels. Pontiac was no different from this.  They decided on a vehicle that was much like their lower level Streamliner in terms of engine, dimensions, trim level and options, but it would use the sportier GM A-Body style instead of the B-Body style of the Streamliner.  This vehicle was called the Pontiac Chieftain and it rose to its expectations by replacing the Torpedo as Pontiac’s top automobile in its first year.

The Yenko Camaro

The Yenko Camaro

Photo Courtesy of hotrod.com

The Camaro has long been associated with speed, power, and respect on the road, however, there was a time when it simply could not compete with the Ford Mustang and Plymouth Barracuda. At the time that the Camaro was first produced, General Motors had a limit which prevented using an engine larger than a 400 cubic inch V8, much unlike its competition, which had no such restriction. Things changed under Don Yenko, who understood that there was a market for more powerful cars, and so began the story of the Yenko Camero, a modified version of the famous car line, produced under Yenko Chevrolet.

1970 Olds 442

1970 Olds 442As a member of the muscle car category, the Olds 442 proved its worth the hard way: Originally, the Olds 442 was an optional package for the F-85 and Cutlass models, beginning in 1964. After the Pontiac division of General Motors experienced an unexpected success with the release of the The Tempest GTO the same year, Oldsmobile quickly compiled the package to keep buyers interested. The 442 did not become an actual car model independent of others, until 1968.

1962 Catalina

1962 Catalina

1962 CatalinaAlthough factory racing had been effectively banned starting in 1957, Pontiac’s late ‘50s and early ‘60s revamping included racing as a major component and the 1962 Catalina was a big part of that move. In the late ‘50s General Motors’ Pontiac brand began to feel a little old and tired. The cars were big, boring, and slow and not many young people were interested in them.

1962 CatalinaPontiac engineers made a turnaround of the brand by ignoring the racing ban and creating parts and packages that helped Pontiac models succeed in NHRA and NASCAR racing. The 1962 Catalina was a prime example of Pontiac’s cars that could be outfitted for racing and which helped to bring the cool back to the brand.

The Top 6 Cars To Restore

Cars to Restore:

63 Buick Riviera 1) 1963-65 Buick Riviera– though parts for this model may be more expensive because they are in high demand among car restorers, some companies are beginning a new reproduction of them, which may mean the price will begin to drop slightly on those parts. As time passes, this car is increasingly more popular as one of the better cars to restore.

2) 1953-54 Chevrolet Bel Air– classic car enthusiasts love this model for many reasons, but we can all appreciate relatively low prices on parts. Everything from mechanical and electrical parts as well as upgrade options for added performance are generally inexpensive, comparatively speaking.

St. Louis Car Museum

St. Louis Car Museum

St Louis Car Museum and SalesThe St. Louis Car Museum has something for everyone interested in classic and vintage vehicles. Not only is this a destination site for simply browsing and viewing classic cars, but it is also a sales center. Consign and sell vehicles from your collection or find the classic car of your dream to buy. The Museum also offers repair and storage services. 

A Diverse Collection

If you’re in the market to shop and buy, few classic car salesrooms has a more diverse inventory to browse. From classic muscle cars to 1950s Messerschmitt models, you’ll find just about every type of vintage car at the St. Louis Car Museum.