Category Archives: Collectible Cars

1965 Pontiac Catalina

As an elongated low-riding model, the 1965 Pontiac Catalina offered many options from color and performance to engine upgrades. The full size two-door hardtop and convertible versions of the Catalina had the ability to use Pontiac’s 421 cid engine, despite the infamous General Motors ban on engines larger than 400 cid. The ban was in effect for intermediate vehicles, allowing the Catalina to skirt the rule because of its status as a full-size vehicle. This fastback further impressed with the addition of the “2+2” package option, which included the bigger engine among a handful of other upgrades. This option was phased out only 2 years later, in 1967, because it simply didn’t achieve the overwhelming successes of the GTO.

3 of the Most Unique American-Built Cars

3 of the Most Unique American-built Cars

54 1954 pontiac bonneville special

There have been many unique cars built that each has their own interesting characteristics.  Three of these cars are classics built in America during the 1940’s and 50’s; we’d like to take the time to showcase them today.

The Nash Rambler: The Big 3′s Competitor

The Nash Rambler: The Big 3′s Competitor

 Nash RamblerThe President of the Nash-Kelvinator Company, George Mason, saw that his company needed to design a car to compete with the “Big 3”, and it had to be something that those companies did not have. He decided to concentrate on a compact car that was small, yet still would fit 5 passengers comfortably.  Finally, he wanted a car that would save Nash on materials but still get great fuel economy and that would compete with companies that were dominating the lower price segment of the market (i.e. Chevrolet, Ford and Plymouth).  His outcome, the first successful modern American compact car, the Nash Rambler.

1971 Chevy Monte Carlo

You may recognize this muscle car from the thrilling opening sequence of the popular movie The Fast and the Furious 3: Tokyo Drift, or you may simply be a fan of the old Chevys, but there is no disputing that the 1971 Chevrolet Monte Carlo holds a special place in the hearts of car enthusiasts.

1971 Chevy Monte CarloThe Monte Carlo was first debuted in 1969 as an answer to the Ford Thunderbird and has since seen five generations of production. The 1971 model sold for $3416 and included verticle, slimmer headlights in comparison to the previous model, but also featured a stand-up hood ornament and an optional four-spoke steering wheel. It had a V8 engine, rear-wheel drive, and coupe style, though it was largely unchanged from the 1970 model. At first, however, sales on this model got off to a slow start due to strikes.

10 of the Most Famous Cars in Movies

10 of the Most Famous Cars in Movies

What classic car enthusiast doesn’t love watching a movie with a wild, rip-roaring chase scene or a loud, growling drag race? What car aficionado doesn’t pay more attention to the car and its specs in a movie rather than the plot? Here we are going to pay homage to those movie-watching car lovers by taking a look at 10 of the Most Famous Cars in Movies.

10. 1972 Ford Gran Torino – Gran Torino (2008):

Plymouth and the History of the Name

Plymouth and the History of the Name

'66 Plymouth FuryIn 1928, Chrysler decided to create a low-price name badge to compete with powerhouses Ford and Chevrolet. The idea was that this line would have features that the other low-priced badges did not. The badge that Chrysler created was Plymouth, which lasted until 2001 when DaimlerChrysler decided to end the brand due to low sales.

Not Named for the Town, but for Farmers’ Twine

How to Ship a Classic Car

How to Ship a Classic Car

Auto TransportIf you want to appreciate human ingenuity you can never go wrong with a proper classic car. Such vehicles remind us of a time when things were built to last. They show us that beauty, utility and tenacity can all go together to create an actual piece of art.

1971 Chevy Chevelle SS

1971 Chevy Chevelle SS

412340-0-lgThe 1971 Chevy Chevelle SS was part of the second generation of Chevy’s muscle cars. When the Chevelle line came into being in 1964, GM hoped it could be competitive with the Ford Fairlane and that it would be a reintroduction of the size and concept of the popular ’55 to ’57 models from Chevrolet. Throughout their run, the Chevelles were available as sport coupes, sport sedans, convertibles, and even wagons.

1967 Corvette

1967 Corvette
1967 Chevrolet CorvetteThe Chevrolet Corvette is the classic American sports car and its popularity, styling, and performance have never been matched by another car. The 1967 Corvette brought up the rear of the second generation that began in 1963. In 1953, the first Corvette, a convertible designed by Harley Earl came out at the GM Motorama as a concept car. This kicked off the first generation or the C1 line of Corvettes, also known as the solid-axle models for their lack of independent rear suspension.

1970 Cuda 440

1970 Cuda 440

Cuda 440The 1970 Cuda 440 was just one member of the well-loved line of Barrcuda muscle cars produced by Plymouth from 1964 to 1974. The first generation of Barracudas ran from 1964 to 1966. They were based on the body of the Plymouth Valiant. From 1967 to 1969, the second generation cars were still Valiant-based, but totally redesigned and available in convertible, fastback, and notchback body styles.