Category Archives: Collectible Cars

Mustang, Mustang

Mustang, Mustang

'67 Ford MustangWith the Mustang, Ford created a new class of cars, the pony car. Less performance-oriented and a little easier on the wallet than a muscle car, the pony car represents the best of both worlds. With the production of the Mustang, and subsequent competitors such as the Chevy Camaro and Dodge Challenger, the automotive industry offered consumers sporty cars with some performance characteristics at a price that many could afford.

The 1969 Mercury Marauder X-100

The 1969 Mercury Marauder X-100

Hanksters Hot Rods and Muscle Cars

Hanksters Hot Rods and Muscle Cars

Hanksters Showrooms
Hanksters is a dream come true for muscle car and hot rod enthusiasts. With two locations and an online searchable inventory, it’s easy to buy, sell, and even finance here. Whether you want to expand your collection, have a specific car in mind, or need to let one of your cars go, Hanksters can help. 

Gary Hankinson has been working with classic cars for decades. For nearly 30 years he has worked on building and repairing, buying and selling hot rods, muscle cars, motorcycles, and other classic vehicles. Along with an expert staff, he has the knowledge and experience to make buying and selling a breeze. 

The Plymouth GTX

70 Plymouth GTXThe Plymouth GTX was an American muscle car produced from 1967-1971. The 1967 Plymouth GTX, originally launched as the Belvedere GTX, shared it’s basic body design with the stylish Plymouth Belvedere. It was seen as a “gentleman’s muscle car” for it’s combination of muscle car power and built-for-comfort street car design. The stock engine for the GTX was the “Super Commando 440,” a 375 horsepower monster made by Plymouth. The state-of-the-art MOPAR 425 horsepower 426 Hemi engine was available as an upgrade.

1965 Chevelle SS

1965 Chevelle SS

65 Chevrolet Chevelle SSThe Chevelle, first introduced in 1964, was Chevy’s answer to the Ford Fairlane. A mid-sized, mid-priced car, the Chevelle proved to be popular for its entire run. One thing that made it such a good seller for the company is the fact that it came in so many different varieties. In the ‘60s, buyers could get nearly any body style, and could choose from low-end to high-end trim levels. And, of course, the Chevelle also included a performance package, the Super Sport.

The 1966 Dodge Charger

The 1966 Dodge Charger

'66 Dodge ChargerThe “Leader of the Dodge Rebellion” was introduced at the 1966 Rose Bowl, and although the Dodge brothers didn’t know it at the time, the 1966 Charger would impact muscle car history forever.

'66 Dodge ChargerThe Charger was built off of the Dodge Coronet chassis, but utilized its own body. This introduction was Dodge’s first fastback, high-speed street racer. The 1966 Charger was the first U.S. production vehicle to boast a spoiler, which was implemented to solve the lift that its body created. David Pearson drove a #6 Cotton Owens-prepared Charger, and won the NASCAR Grand National championship in 1966 (in addition to 14 other first-place finishes).

Pontiac Revived: The Chieftain

Pontiac Revived: The Chieftain

1950 Pontiac Chieftain When World War II had come and gone, many car companies were looking for new car designs to boost their sales to the pre-World War II levels. Pontiac was no different from this.  They decided on a vehicle that was much like their lower level Streamliner in terms of engine, dimensions, trim level and options, but it would use the sportier GM A-Body style instead of the B-Body style of the Streamliner.  This vehicle was called the Pontiac Chieftain and it rose to its expectations by replacing the Torpedo as Pontiac’s top automobile in its first year.

The Yenko Camaro

The Yenko Camaro

Photo Courtesy of hotrod.com

The Camaro has long been associated with speed, power, and respect on the road, however, there was a time when it simply could not compete with the Ford Mustang and Plymouth Barracuda. At the time that the Camaro was first produced, General Motors had a limit which prevented using an engine larger than a 400 cubic inch V8, much unlike its competition, which had no such restriction. Things changed under Don Yenko, who understood that there was a market for more powerful cars, and so began the story of the Yenko Camero, a modified version of the famous car line, produced under Yenko Chevrolet.

The Top 6 Cars To Restore

Cars to Restore:

63 Buick Riviera 1) 1963-65 Buick Riviera– though parts for this model may be more expensive because they are in high demand among car restorers, some companies are beginning a new reproduction of them, which may mean the price will begin to drop slightly on those parts. As time passes, this car is increasingly more popular as one of the better cars to restore.

2) 1953-54 Chevrolet Bel Air– classic car enthusiasts love this model for many reasons, but we can all appreciate relatively low prices on parts. Everything from mechanical and electrical parts as well as upgrade options for added performance are generally inexpensive, comparatively speaking.

Nearly Forgotten: Plymouth Superbird

70 Plymouth SuperbirdWhen Plymouth unveiled the Road Runner in 1968, the response was overwhelmingly positive and it still remains among the most popular of muscle cars. Because of its success, it was only natural that Plymouth attempted to up the ante shortly following its release. The Plymouth Superbird came along in 1970 and it served as a modified version of the ever-popular Road Runner. It was built with the intent to appear in the NASCAR circuit, and as a part of the NASCAR rules, there had to be street-legal versions of this beauty.