Category Archives: Sports Car

The 5 Fastest Muscle Cars

The 5 Fastest Muscle Cars

The smell of rubber burning and exhaust spewing, the scream of tires grinding against pavement and the crowd cheering on their favorite, and the heat and sweat of a summer night filled with adrenaline – that, my friend, is a drag race.

While everyone likes an exhilarating and exciting drag race, seeing no one in front of you when the checkered flag is flashed, holding the coveted trophy or just the having bragging rights shows you are the winner, you have the fastest car – everyone lusts for a taste of that!  That is why I bring you the Top 5 Fastest Muscle Cars according to Muscle Car Review Magazine, ranked based on their elapsed time on a quarter-mile track.

The First Generation Dodge Challenger

Dodge ChallengerThe original Dodge Challenger, produced from 1970-1974, was Dodge’s attempt at entering the popular pony car market, epitomized by the Ford Mustang. The Challenger shared its Chrysler E-body platform with the Plymouth Barracuda, although it was slightly larger. Chrysler-Dodge intended the Challenger to compete with the more luxurious pony cars of the time. Unfortunately for the company, by the time the Challenger’s design was complete, it was a bit late and the pony car wave was already beginning to fade. For this reason, it did not have nearly the success that the Chrysler brain trust had hoped for.

Fastest American Production Cars

Fastest American Production Cars

Photo Courtesy of Chevrolet.com

When most people think of the fastest cars, they usually look to European sports cars. The Ferrari, Bugatti, Lamborghini, and Porsche sports cars have continually impressed car enthusiasts who look for as much speed as possible. American fast-car enthusiasts are not limited to the automakers in Italy, Germany, and the UK, because there are several extremely fast cars that are manufactured in the United States. These are some of the fastest:

Photo Courtesy of AutoWeek.com

911

911

1975 Porsche 911Of all the legendary cars made by Porsche over the years, perhaps the most iconic is the 911. During the 1950s, the German automaker’s only real model was the 356, and it was the model upon which the company began to build its reputation. Replacing it posed risks, but the fledgling line of sports cars needed something new, bigger, and more powerful. The result was the Porsche 911. Today the 911 is a true legend in the automotive world, but it was a risk when the first one sold in 1964 as a 1965 model.

Boxster

Boxster

'98 Porsche BoxsterThe Porsche Boxster is a popular model from the German automaker that has been around since 1996. The two-seater roadster includes mid-engine placement and rear-wheel drive and was the first car the company designed to be a roadster since the introduction of the 550 Spyder in the 1950s. Porsche brought out the Boxster at a time when the company had hit a rough patch. The model was just what they needed, as it proved to be a hit with both buyers and critics. The Boxster was the first completely new design in decades and it was available at a reasonable price. Both factors contributed greatly to its popularity.

Chevy 150

Chevy 150

Chevy 150
One of the banner years for automobiles, especially Chevys, was 1957. This year brought about some of the most iconic automobiles, as well as, congressional hearings that would change stock car racing forever.

Early NASCAR races were held on the beach at Daytona Beach, Florida and the last beach race was held in 1958. In the year before this final race, the United States Congress got involved in racing because of the fact that so many men and women were involved in reckless racing on public roads. Since so many manufacturers began selling cars like the Chevy 150 and the Ford Fairlane that could easily be modified into lightning-fast hot rods, street racing quickly became a problem in city neighborhoods and rural areas.

356 Replica

356 Replica

Porsche For those who admire and dream of owning a legendary Porsche 356, but can never scrape together enough money for one, there is always the 356 Replica. Replicas and kit cars are popular with car enthusiasts with thin wallets. Take a standard, regular old car and build it up to look and drive like your dream car. Replicas are not always cheap, but they are much less expensive than the original models that inspire them. They are also easier to get your hands on, as compared to many limited-production originals.

Streetside Classics Now Open in Phoenix

Streetside Classics Now Open in Phoenix

PhoenixThe growing Streetside Classics family continues to expand and offer more locations to better serve their car-loving customers. The latest location for Streetside recently opened in Mesa, Arizona, just minutes from downtown Phoenix. The Phoenix showroom joins the original location in Charlotte, as well as showrooms in Atlanta, Dallas/Fort Worth, Tampa, and Nashville.

Founder Donna Robbins opened the original Charlotte showroom in 2008 after ten years in the business of buying and selling classic cars. She set out with a working philosophy of always putting customers first and driven by a passion for collectible cars and never looked back. Robbins and her team now have one of the biggest sales volumes for collector cars in the country.

Ford at the Le Mans Race

Ford at the Le Mans Race 1964 Ford GT40The Le Mans race is the oldest continuous car race and has been going on since 1923, other than 1936 and the years between 1940 and 1948 due to World War II. Racing teams keep their car going for 24 hours as drivers drive prestigious and fast cars for two hours at a time. They rest for two hours and then get back to it again. Most recent changes have changed the teams from two drivers to three drivers. The race has been held in Le Mans, France and is always scheduled in the summer. 1954 JaguarOver the nearly 90 years of racing, the majority of winning automobiles have been made by European carmakers. In the first ten years of the race, the majority of winners were cars made by Bentley or Alfa Romeo. In the 1950s, the majority of winners were manufactured by Ferrari or Jaguar. The winners seemed to flip-flop between cars made in Italy and in the UK, until the late-1960s, when Ford GT40 models were back-to-back winners for four straight years. The Ford GT40 was the first American-made car to win the Le Mans. After the four Ford GT40 wins, the only other American-made entry was a McLaren F1 GTR in 1995. The first year that the Ford GT40 won, it did not just win, but a GT40 finished in first, second, and third place. The winning drivers in 1966 included Bruce McLaren a driver from New Zealand and Chris Amon. The following year, AJ Foyt and Dan Gurney took first, with McLaren’s team coming up in fourth. In 1968, only one Ford GT40 finished in the top 10 and it was raced by Pedro Rodriguez and Lucien Bianchi. In its final year of racing, the 1969 winning team included Jacky Ickx and Jackie Oliver. A second Ford GT40 finished in third place that year. Interestingly, two of the GT40 drivers, AJ Foyt and Jacky Ickx, were some of the most successful drivers in the history of the Le Mans races. Foyt won three times, which was exactly how many times he participated in the race. Ickx won six times.

959

959

Porsche 959

Photo Courtesy of Auto Week

A true supercar of the 1980s, the Porsche 959 was created by the German car company to comply with regulations for FIA homologation. The 959 was a part of what many fans deem the Golden Age of rally racing, Group B. To satisfy rules for racing the 959 in Group B, Porsche needed to make at least 200 street-legal units. The result was the fastest road-ready car in the world at the time. Porsche ended up making 337 of these cars between 1986 and 1989.

Porsche 959

Photo Courtesy of Car and Driver