Tag Archives: 1966

The 5 Fastest Muscle Cars

The 5 Fastest Muscle Cars

The smell of rubber burning and exhaust spewing, the scream of tires grinding against pavement and the crowd cheering on their favorite, and the heat and sweat of a summer night filled with adrenaline – that, my friend, is a drag race.

While everyone likes an exhilarating and exciting drag race, seeing no one in front of you when the checkered flag is flashed, holding the coveted trophy or just the having bragging rights shows you are the winner, you have the fastest car – everyone lusts for a taste of that!  That is why I bring you the Top 5 Fastest Muscle Cars according to Muscle Car Review Magazine, ranked based on their elapsed time on a quarter-mile track.

1966 Plymouth Valiant Signet Hardtop

1966 Plymouth Valiant Signet Hardtop

1966 Plymouth Valiant The Plymouth Valiant brought the Chrysler car company great success in the 1960s and 1970s. Chrysler intended for the Valiant to be part of the growing compact segment, and it sold well in the U.S. as well as in foreign markets. The 1966 Plymouth Valiant Signet hardtop was one of the models in the second generation that ran from 1963 to 1966.

1966 Plymouth Valiant The 1966 Plymouth Valiant Signet hardtop originated at the start of the second generation of Valiants with the 1963 Signet hardtop coupe. This little compact was sporty and stylish, and a major competitor for the Ford Falcon and Chevy Corvair. While the latter received only mild face lifts for 1963, Chrysler remade the Valiant and created the well-received Signet.

Mitt Romney and the Kinda Awful Car

Mitt Romney and the Kinda Awful Car

'66 AMC MarlinIn 2002, Mitt Romney ran for governor of Massachusetts. During the political campaign, Mitt and Ann Romney appeared in an advertisement about how they fell in love. The television advertisement was designed to show the Romneys were just like the regular citizens of Massachusetts. In the ad, Ann Romney talks about how Mitt showed up at her house in a “goofy-looking car.” Romney, himself, calls the car “kinda awful.”

'66 AMC MarlinWhat the Kinda Awful Car Actually Was

The 1966 Dodge Charger

The 1966 Dodge Charger

'66 Dodge ChargerThe “Leader of the Dodge Rebellion” was introduced at the 1966 Rose Bowl, and although the Dodge brothers didn’t know it at the time, the 1966 Charger would impact muscle car history forever.

'66 Dodge ChargerThe Charger was built off of the Dodge Coronet chassis, but utilized its own body. This introduction was Dodge’s first fastback, high-speed street racer. The 1966 Charger was the first U.S. production vehicle to boast a spoiler, which was implemented to solve the lift that its body created. David Pearson drove a #6 Cotton Owens-prepared Charger, and won the NASCAR Grand National championship in 1966 (in addition to 14 other first-place finishes).

1966 Chevelle SS

1966 Chevelle SS

66 Chevrolet Chevelle SSThe 1966 Chevelle SS is a classic of the muscle car era in American automotive history. While Chevy’s Chevelle came out in 1964 to compete with the Ford Fairlane, it quickly became one of the brand’s best sellers. The key to the car’s success was in the versatility. The Chevelle was a mid-sized car that appealed to many and included body styles from coupes to sedans to wagons and convertibles. Trim levels included the Laguna and upscale Malibu, and when the latter also included the Super Sport package, a classic muscle car was born.

Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme

Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme

OldsmobileThe Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme is one of the classic nameplates from the legendary brand that lasted for over 100 years. The mid-sized Cutlass Supreme came out in 1966 and lasted for five generations, through 1997 when the Intrigue replaced all of the Cutlass models.

The first Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme was a trim level in 1966, for the hardtop, four-door sedan. The high-level Supreme trim included a plush interior with a bench and armrest, new, deluxe door panels, and full wheel covers. This first Supreme was also known as the Holiday Sedan. Just one year later, the Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme came into its own and the name represented a full series. The new line-up included a Holiday and a Sport Coupe, a convertible, and a Town Sedan. All members of the line were more luxurious than those in the Cutlass series.

1966 427 Fairlane

1966 427 Fairlane

1966 427 FairlaneFrom 1955 to 1970 Ford produced the Fairlane, a sometimes full-sized, sometimes mid-sized car that was the ancestor of many of the modern Ford brands. The Fairlane was restyled and resized throughout the ‘50s and early ‘60s, by which time it made its place between the compact Falcon and the full-sized Galaxie. By mid ‘60s, and the introduction of the 1966 427 Fairlane, Ford was ready to compete with other American muscle cars.

1966 GTO

1966 GTO

1966 Pontiac GTOPontiac’s GTO was developed at a time when GM had banned involvement in racing for all of its divisions. Instead of creating a car that could participate in racing, then, the creators of the GTO muscle car focused on performance and street cred. They took the Pontiac Tempest and redesigned it into a “Super Tempest” with a bigger engine and a name borrowed from Ferrari.

1966 Corvette 427

1966 Corvette 427

66 corvetteThe 1966 Corvette 427 represented the biggest change to this classic sports car since its introduction in 1953. It was the best Corvette to come out of Chevrolet to that point with better seating for driver and passenger, more space, a better ride and handling, and most importantly, the best level of performance yet. Today, the 1966 Corvette 427 is huge with collectors.

1966 corvette The greatness of the 1966 Corvette 427 begins with the design. The styling came from the Stingray racer from 1959 to 1960. Unique elements on the sports car included hidden headlights, a ducktail aft section, peaked fenders, and a fastback coupe body style. It was by far the coolest looking car on the road in its day.

Mustang, Mustang

Mustang, Mustang

Ford MustangWith the Ford Mustang, Mustang created a new class of cars, the pony car. Less performance-oriented and a little easier on the wallet than a muscle car, the pony car represents the best of both worlds. With the production of the Mustang, and subsequent competitors such as the Chevy Camaro and Dodge Challenger, the automotive industry offered consumers sporty cars with some performance characteristics at a price that many could afford.