Tag Archives: Big Three

7 of the Most Popular Classic Cars

7 of the most popular classic cars

Before buying or selling a classic car, an important factor to consider is its popularity for a number of reasons. Popularity could indicate the odds of selling the car if that is the intention- certainly it is easier to sell something that is in demand. At the same time, however, when buying a classic car, a popular car can make it difficult to find parts, and prices typically reflect that. Indeed, it can be much more expensive to repair a popular classic car. Aside from buying and selling, though, it’s just plain interesting to learn about some of the most popular cars. Here’s a list of 7 of the most popular classic cars. Drum roll, please!

Good News Out Of Detroit

Good News Out Of Detroit: detroit big threeWhen you evaluate the classic cars that we have come to know and love over the years it is impossible to imagine our country without American cars being produced. This is the prospect that we were faced with about three years ago when the automotive industry was in dire straits.

There was a lot of controversy about bailouts and we are not here to make any statements pro or con. But what we will say is that there was some fantastic news being reported across the Internet today regarding the state of American automotive manufacturing.

The 1962 Studebaker Lark

As America began a new era in the early 1960s, the Studebaker Corporation was desperately tweaking a model which was losing steam. The Studebaker Lark was first introduced in 1959, but by 1961, its sales were already declining. The compact car was missing an iconic American car feature of the time: tail fins. Its design lent itself more to European style, making it difficult for the car to continue competing against other car companies such as the Big 3, which had better adapted to the fickle preferences of the American consumers.

Is It a Car or a Truck?

During the heyday of automobile manufacturing in the United States, the”Big Three” of American automobile manufacturing endeavored to offer something for everyone. Engendering brand loyalty was a big part of their marketing strategy, and these companies didn’t want to lose customers because a competitor was offering a type of vehicle that they were not. Ford and General Motors were more inclined than Chrysler to engage in this tit for tat, and General Motors usually had the edge because they would often times design a competing vehicle from more than one of their divisions. For example, after the stunning success that Ford had with the Mustang, General Motors countered with the Chevy Camaro as well as the Pontiac Firebird.