Tag Archives: Chevrolet

A Different Kind of Bird

A Different Kind of Bird

1970 FirebirdIt’s almost Thanksgiving! Even though we have another week to prepare for the festivities, we’re starting now: the turkeys have been ordered, we are dreaming of pumpkin pies, and bread is being torn into little pieces for the perfect stuffing. It’s a day devoted to giving thanks for all we are grateful for as much as it is devoted to the perfectly prepared bird-the turkey, of course!

At the same time, though, we’re giving thanks for a different type of bird, the Pontiac Firebird.

1967 Chevrolet Nova

1967 Chevrolet Nova

1967 Chevy NovaThe 1967 Chevrolet Nova has its roots in the 1962 Chevy II. The original model was called the Chevy II, but the top trim lines and sportier versions got to wear the Nova nameplate. By 1968, the name Chevy II was totally out, and Nova was in. The Nova/Chevy II cars essentially rescued Chevrolet’s entry in the compact car market. Previously, the Corvair held that place in the Chevrolet brand, but it had an odd style and consumers had safety concerns.

The Chevrolet Chevelle SS

The Chevrolet Chevelle SS

64 Chevrolet ChevelleChevrolet got a lot of mileage out of the Chevelle series in the 1960s, offering everything from soup to nuts under the name Chevelle. In a very real sense, the Chevelle line could have been a brand in and of itself capable of meeting the needs of most consumers with one car or another. Let’s look at the 1968 model year as an example. They made the Chevelle 300, which was a two-door coupe; the 300 Deluxe, offered as a two-door coupe and either a two or four-door sedan; the Nomad and Nomad Deluxe wagons; the Chevelle Concours Estate wagon; the Chevelle Malibu in five different variations; the Chevelle Malibu Sport; and the muscular Chevelle Super Sport, or “SS.”

Is It a Car or a Truck?

Is It a Car or a Truck?

 

66 Chevrolet El CaminoDuring the heyday of automobile manufacturing in the United States, the”Big Three” of American automobile manufacturing endeavored to offer something for everyone. Engendering brand loyalty was a big part of their marketing strategy, and these companies didn’t want to lose customers because a competitor was offering a type of vehicle that they were not. Ford and General Motors were more inclined than Chrysler to engage in this tit for tat, and General Motors usually had the edge because they would often times design a competing vehicle from more than one of their divisions. For example, after the stunning success that Ford had with the Mustang, General Motors countered with the Chevy Camaro as well as the Pontiac Firebird.

1967 Chevelle

1967 Chevelle

1967 Chevrolet ChevelleAs one of the most popular classic cars, the 1967 Chevrolet Chevelle is highly sought-after among car enthusiasts. Both the coupe and convertible versions are popular. The 1967 Chevelle model had a slightly more aggressive look than the previous year’s model because of a reworked bumper. In this post, we’ll take a look at the classic Chevrolet.

1965 Chevelle SS

1965 Chevelle SS

65 Chevrolet Chevelle SSThe Chevelle, first introduced in 1964, was Chevy’s answer to the Ford Fairlane. A mid-sized, mid-priced car, the Chevelle proved to be popular for its entire run. One thing that made it such a good seller for the company is the fact that it came in so many different varieties. In the ‘60s, buyers could get nearly any body style, and could choose from low-end to high-end trim levels. And, of course, the Chevelle also included a performance package, the Super Sport.

The Yenko Camaro

The Yenko Camaro

Photo Courtesy of hotrod.com

The Camaro has long been associated with speed, power, and respect on the road, however, there was a time when it simply could not compete with the Ford Mustang and Plymouth Barracuda. At the time that the Camaro was first produced, General Motors had a limit which prevented using an engine larger than a 400 cubic inch V8, much unlike its competition, which had no such restriction. Things changed under Don Yenko, who understood that there was a market for more powerful cars, and so began the story of the Yenko Camero, a modified version of the famous car line, produced under Yenko Chevrolet.

The Top 6 Cars To Restore

Cars to Restore:

63 Buick Riviera 1) 1963-65 Buick Riviera– though parts for this model may be more expensive because they are in high demand among car restorers, some companies are beginning a new reproduction of them, which may mean the price will begin to drop slightly on those parts. As time passes, this car is increasingly more popular as one of the better cars to restore.

2) 1953-54 Chevrolet Bel Air– classic car enthusiasts love this model for many reasons, but we can all appreciate relatively low prices on parts. Everything from mechanical and electrical parts as well as upgrade options for added performance are generally inexpensive, comparatively speaking.

A Look Inside Jay Leno’s Garage

Photo Courtesy of motor1.com

Jay Leno is not only one of the most successful talk show hosts in the history of network television; he is also an avid car collector. He maintains a garage in Southern California housing over 200 fine collector cars and motorcycles. Leno has a passion for automobiles and does not simply house them as museum pieces; you can catch him tooling around the So Cal area in a different car, every day of the week.

The Durable Dodge Dart

The Durable Dodge Dart

1966 Dodge Dart If you were a young driver looking for an inexpensive used car in the late 1970s, your elders were invariably going to recommend that you try to find yourself an old Dodge Dart. Now these sixties-vintage Darts were not going to turn many heads or have any cheerleaders asking you for a ride home, but they were reliable, durable, economical, and easy to repair.