Tag Archives: collectible cars

Pontiac Revived: The Chieftain

Pontiac Revived: The Chieftain

1950 Pontiac Chieftain When World War II had come and gone, many car companies were looking for new car designs to boost their sales to the pre-World War II levels. Pontiac was no different from this.  They decided on a vehicle that was much like their lower level Streamliner in terms of engine, dimensions, trim level and options, but it would use the sportier GM A-Body style instead of the B-Body style of the Streamliner.  This vehicle was called the Pontiac Chieftain and it rose to its expectations by replacing the Torpedo as Pontiac’s top automobile in its first year.

The Yenko Camaro

The Yenko Camaro

Photo Courtesy of hotrod.com

The Camaro has long been associated with speed, power, and respect on the road, however, there was a time when it simply could not compete with the Ford Mustang and Plymouth Barracuda. At the time that the Camaro was first produced, General Motors had a limit which prevented using an engine larger than a 400 cubic inch V8, much unlike its competition, which had no such restriction. Things changed under Don Yenko, who understood that there was a market for more powerful cars, and so began the story of the Yenko Camero, a modified version of the famous car line, produced under Yenko Chevrolet.

1970 Olds 442

1970 Olds 442As a member of the muscle car category, the Olds 442 proved its worth the hard way: Originally, the Olds 442 was an optional package for the F-85 and Cutlass models, beginning in 1964. After the Pontiac division of General Motors experienced an unexpected success with the release of the The Tempest GTO the same year, Oldsmobile quickly compiled the package to keep buyers interested. The 442 did not become an actual car model independent of others, until 1968.

The First Personal Luxury Car: Ford’s Thunderbird

The First Personal Luxury Car: Ford’s Thunderbird

1955 Ford ThunderbirdThe ultimate American personal luxury car of the heyday of the Big Three had to be the Cadillac Eldorado, but the very first of the breed was the Ford Thunderbird. The car went into development in 1953 as competition for the new Chevy Corvette as a sporty two-seat convertible, and by 1954 the first prototype was introduced at the Detroit Auto Show, in February; by September of ’54 the T-Bird went into production. The first 1955 Ford Thunderbird models were offered to the public by the end of October that same year.

3 of the Most Unique American-Built Cars

3 of the Most Unique American-built Cars

54 1954 pontiac bonneville special

There have been many unique cars built that each has their own interesting characteristics.  Three of these cars are classics built in America during the 1940’s and 50’s; we’d like to take the time to showcase them today.

The Nash Rambler: The Big 3′s Competitor

The Nash Rambler: The Big 3′s Competitor

 Nash RamblerThe President of the Nash-Kelvinator Company, George Mason, saw that his company needed to design a car to compete with the “Big 3”, and it had to be something that those companies did not have. He decided to concentrate on a compact car that was small, yet still would fit 5 passengers comfortably.  Finally, he wanted a car that would save Nash on materials but still get great fuel economy and that would compete with companies that were dominating the lower price segment of the market (i.e. Chevrolet, Ford and Plymouth).  His outcome, the first successful modern American compact car, the Nash Rambler.

1971 Chevy Monte Carlo

You may recognize this muscle car from the thrilling opening sequence of the popular movie The Fast and the Furious 3: Tokyo Drift, or you may simply be a fan of the old Chevys, but there is no disputing that the 1971 Chevrolet Monte Carlo holds a special place in the hearts of car enthusiasts.

1971 Chevy Monte CarloThe Monte Carlo was first debuted in 1969 as an answer to the Ford Thunderbird and has since seen five generations of production. The 1971 model sold for $3416 and included verticle, slimmer headlights in comparison to the previous model, but also featured a stand-up hood ornament and an optional four-spoke steering wheel. It had a V8 engine, rear-wheel drive, and coupe style, though it was largely unchanged from the 1970 model. At first, however, sales on this model got off to a slow start due to strikes.

10 of the Most Famous Cars in Movies

10 of the Most Famous Cars in Movies

What classic car enthusiast doesn’t love watching a movie with a wild, rip-roaring chase scene or a loud, growling drag race? What car aficionado doesn’t pay more attention to the car and its specs in a movie rather than the plot? Here we are going to pay homage to those movie-watching car lovers by taking a look at 10 of the Most Famous Cars in Movies.

10. 1972 Ford Gran Torino – Gran Torino (2008):

Code Name “Panther”

Code Name “Panther”

1967 Chevy Camaro

The Ford Mustang had an extraordinary impact on the automotive industry after its release in April of 1964.

As you might expect, the other major automobile manufacturers immediately got to work on their versions of a pony car so that they could garner their share of this burgeoning new market.

1967 Chevrolet CamaroIn 1965 rumors began to circulate about the Chevrolet division of General Motors developing a competitor under the code name “Panther”.

Carroll Shelby’s “Other Car” – The Sunbeam Tiger

Some people dream of getting their hands on one of the brilliantly designed cars by Carroll Shelby, but their dreams fall short when they look at the price tag of his famous Cobras or Mustangs.  There is good news for them; Mr. Shelby designed the Rootes Group Sunbeam Tiger, as well! In 1964, the Rootes Group was looking for a way to revamp the Sunbeam Alpine’s image from a “touring” car to a “sports car/roadster”.  They wanted the car to be modeled after the recently successful Shelby Cobra.  After some research and the decision to use the Ford’s 164hp 4.3L Windsor V8 engine, who was better to ask to design their car than the man himself, Carroll Shelby?  Shelby agreed to design the car for $10,000.  His prototype, along with the prototype built by racer and previous employee of Shelby America, Ken Miles, were sent to England for production.